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    Talbot or Fiat?

    I saw this on ebay today:

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Fait-moto....c100005.m1851

    The ad says it's a Fiat (spelled 'Fait') but the badge on the grill is, I'm sure a Talbot badge. The cabin is an Elddis.

    Quite an oldie but the sort of thing I'd like to buy if I was to change to a camper van or motorhome.
    Cynthia

    #2
    MOT check says Talbot Express. https://www.check-mot.service.gov.uk/

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Gulliver7952 View Post
      MOT check says Talbot Express. https://www.check-mot.service.gov.uk/
      Ah, thanks for that! So where does the 'Fait' fit into the scheme of things I wonder?!
      Cynthia.

      Comment


        #4
        Fait accompli?

        It doesn't really matter as the Fiat Ducato of that age and the Talbot Express were virtually the same vehicle. Produced as part of the Sevel Sud joint venture between PSA Peugeot Citroën and Fiat, they were all made in Italy alongside the Peugeot J5 and Citroën C25.

        Comment


          #5
          Cas is correct, we used to have a Talbot express, ours was a highwayman, we loved it but it was a petrol and a bit thirsty

          Comment


            #6
            As Cas says, the Talbot Express was just one of many badges used on the PSA/Fiat joint venture. Badges and minor styling details aside they are all the same van.
            Better a rainy day on the hill than a sunny day in the office!

            Comment


              #7
              I had a Highwayman too Rennie. Totally reliable, but a bit thirsty and a terrible gear change . Underpowered too.
              Still crazy after all these beers.

              Comment


                #8
                So, they'll be crossed off my wish list then!
                Cynthia

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Grumblewagon View Post
                  I had a Highwayman too Rennie. Totally reliable, but a bit thirsty and a terrible gear change . Underpowered too.
                  I had a Fiat Ducatto version as a courier driving in London - so lots of gearchanges. The terrible gearchange was due to an extension converting LHD (the way it was designed) to RHD the solution was available as an aftermarket kit that fitted better bushes to the extension bit. If you want a vehicle designed to be RHD (ignoring Morgans) you need to look at Japanese vehicles.

                  Jon
                  Amor omnia vincit et nos cedamus amori
                  https://smallromahome2oldies1largedog.blogspot.co.uk/

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The gearbox didn't bother me! The thing would bat along quite happily on the flat or downhill (70+mph!) but any whiff of an uphill gradient and it just stopped!
                    no power steering either! and lots of petrol fumes on the overrun! The engine was very quiet though and the body was big and easy to live with.The cost of spares and the
                    20=25 mpg meant that it had to go but we loved it. I may have some pics somewhere, if/when I find them I'll put some up.

                    I wouldn't automatically discount them Cyn! depends on how many miles you intend to do etc.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by rennie View Post
                      The gearbox didn't bother me! The thing would bat along quite happily on the flat or downhill (70+mph!) but any whiff of an uphill gradient and it just stopped!
                      no power steering either! and lots of petrol fumes on the overrun! The engine was very quiet though and the body was big and easy to live with.The cost of spares and the
                      20=25 mpg meant that it had to go but we loved it. I may have some pics somewhere, if/when I find them I'll put some up.

                      I wouldn't automatically discount them Cyn! depends on how many miles you intend to do etc.
                      Pipe dreams at the moment anyway Rennie! I changed from a folding caravan (ease of towing + low weight, but she was tiny, took a long time to set up/pack away) and I wanted a bit more space, hence reverting to a conventional caravan. Loving the extra space but worried that now she's sprung a leak it might be the first of many!

                      The trouble is, with any unit there always seems to be a compromise to be made. I love the idea of the convenience of a camper van, but I'd have to go back to being in more cramped conditions again!

                      I would be doing 10 - 12k miles per year, as I would have to use it as my general transport. There's another advantage to the caravan - my Skoda pulls it well, and it's a very economical little motor to use solo.

                      Decisions, decisions as Graham was saying in another thread!
                      Cynthia.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I love the idea of a motorhome over our caravan, I appreciate the ease of getting to places, particular on motorways, getting stuck behind a slow lorry trying to overtake an equally slow lorry is very frustrating. I cannot use the third lane which makes me want to rush out and buy one straightaway, but when I get on site and set up the van I am more than happy with my unit. Having a car to go off in for the day or quick trip to the shops is easier with a car. Motorhomes do have a bad name in some places because of the inconsiderate few and more and more carparks are putting up high barriers. The actual cost of buying is, to my mind is horrendous and unless you can afford to splash out a relatively new one you are going to get an older vehicle with its own problems. The MPG and service costs, not many local garages have the facilities for the bigger motorhomes are something to consider too.
                        IMHO a car and caravan is a cheaper option all round, two units means you can upgrade one as and when you want, secondhand car prices give you so many options and there are equally many more options with caravan size, layouts and prices. Also automatic motorhomes are like hens teeth.
                        Having said all that, the Caravan Club is now the Caravan and Motorhome Club and I believe of there membership 48% own motorhomes, in addition motorhome ownership through out Europe is about 2 to 1 in favour of motorhomes over caravans.
                        Yes I will still fume within when I am stuck behind a slow moving lorry, especially when a motorhome overtakes me in the third lane but I think we have the best of both worlds with our car and caravan unit.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Well said fenman , I couldn't have put it better myself. Some very valid points made.

                          I love the economical travel I get with the Skoda; even when towing she still achieves up to 38mpg (that went down on the last outing to 27mpg, as I was towing into the teeth of a storm!). But I think my panic button was well and truly set off when I discovered the water ingress in the caravan. It's the first time I've ever encountered it in about 28 years of caravanning. However, I suppose there is nothing to say it couldn't happen in a camper van or MH?

                          I was so chuffed when I bought Ethel the Elddis; I've already had two outings in her since October and was luxuriating not only in the extra space over that I'd had in the folder, but the extra cupboard space and a general upgrade in facilities. I hadn't foreseen the necessity of buying a cover! (and a bigger ladder, in order to be able to fit it!)
                          Cynthia.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            We had a couple of motorhomes based on the Talbot Express, both Autosleepers, one the CXL was a van conversion and a Talisman which was a GRP coachbuilt. The gearbox was a bit clunky and something to get used to, I used to use the CXL to go to work in every day so it wasn't that bad, the Talisman was a bit underpowered and fuel consumption was pretty abysmal but we had our Talisman converted to run on LPG which much improved the running costs. On the plus side, the engine was virtually indestructible and was known for doing incredibly high milages more than motorhomes were ever likely to clock up. The real issue for you, Cynthia, I would have thought with a vehicle of this age, Talbot expresses were replaced by the Boxer in around 1995, would be the lack of rear seatbelts. Our CXL didn't have any and although there were seatbelts in the rear of the Talisman the seat bases were wooden which in the event of an accident were likely to disintegrate and if memory serves me correctly the seatbelts were only lapbelts.
                            Janet

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thanks The Sitter Janet, you're absolutely right, I would need two passenger seats with proper 3-point belts for my grandchildren. Not something I'd be prepared to compromise on! I have seen small camper van conversions like Daihatsus and DSKs with this set-up. There is a camper conversion company in Weston-super-Mare which I might visit to see whether they've kitted out one of these small vans. They would at least be fairly economical for daily use, even with a petrol engine, but are they underpowered, at just 1.3L? Anyone have any experience of these vans?
                              Cynthia.

                              Comment

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