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Bank warns of massive number of Motorhome selling scams over the Bank Holiday

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    Bank warns of massive number of Motorhome selling scams over the Bank Holiday

    I sold my Stimson today. The sellers bank had her jumping through hoops trying to get the sale to go through. Their explanation? Over the Bank Holiday weekend they have experienced an unprecedented number of scams involving the buy/sell of motorhomes. So much so that they are now blocking any transaction that mentions motorhomes. They put the transaction on hold and only after the buyer has called to ask why will they release the funds. They get a text saying there's an issue. Which is fine as long as the mobile coverage is working. We were using my wifi to do the bank tranfers each using our own computers but the money wasn't reaching my account even though I knew they had set it up to the correct account. The security checks were lenghty so if they had not been prepared with all the right info the deal would have fallen through.

    COVID has even effected the motorhome market since it took off recently and the scammers are targeting people's willingness to buy one. It is mainly people loosing deposits they have made for a motorhome. When they turn up it is a false address and when the find the correct address the owner wasn't selling and knows nothing about it.

    #2
    Seller should read buyer in the first line.

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      #3
      Sadly just more scams in an ever increasing list of scams..you certainly have to be very vigilant these days.
      Read everything...believe nothing...and never click on any of the "helpful" links provided.

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        #4
        It’s never stopped on eBay. I’ve reported numerous Motorhome scams to them but they still keep getting listed. For private sales the rule is, Don’t hand over any money until you’ve got the goods ! The easy ones to avoid are the ones with an email address in the photos. But be warned, they’re quite clever.

        I bought a motorcycle from USA a couple of years back, even after phone calls between myself and the seller neither of us was really willing to divulge bank details. But in the USA for around $20 you can search for someone’s identity including criminal records. That said, it was still a leap of faith which included him standing in front of the bike holding up a card with details I’d asked for. Good news is, it all went well. But for too many sadly that’s not the case

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          #5
          It's been this way with banks and building societies for a year or two now. When buying the little Skamper, I had to go for an interview with the manager and take all the relevant paperwork, a printout of the advertisement, any email conversations printed out, etc. All to prove I was dealing with a real live person... That was at a building society and a few years ago! But I believe the banks are just as cautious.

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            #6
            Nationwide are particularly bad / unhelpful / difficult to deal with. Alicia recently got some inheritance money and we gave our Natiownwide details to the solicitor who was holding the money. The solicitor said that the Nationwide computer would not accept the money because the account name didn't match. After several weeks of it not being transferred I called Nationwide and asked for my account name. Our on line statements only have a number. Nationwide refused to tell me my account name. Therefore I cycled 14 miles each way to the nearest branch, with my passport, Nationwide cards, driving licence and asked for the account name. They refused to tell me. In the end I asked the solicitor to use every possible combination of initials, first names, second names and surnames and eventually after three weeks of trying the money was transferred.

            I tried to log into my gov.uk account because we think we owed some capital gains tax on Alicia's mother's property which was now sold. The gov.uk site wanted to verify that I was who I said I was. It asked three security questions, two of which I could answer. The third was "when did you last open a bank account?" As it was Nationwide I needed to know when I opened it. Their wonderful "You can do everything on line" system only allows you to look at the last two years' statements and that's no good so again I phoned them. They refused to tell me when I opened the account. I went to the branch, again with all my ID. They refused to tell me and they insisted that the www I had gone to was a scam. They did not take the address to test it, they just refused to tell me when I opened the account. So because I could not log on to the gov web site I sent the HMRC a cheque for the amount I thought I owed. I sent a complaint letter to Nationwide including the detailed web site address I had used to try to log on to, and asked them to try that address and let me know if it was a scam address. That was several weeks ago. I have not had a reply. If it was a scam address I would like to know.
            This is the address I used, in case anyone is clever enough to tell if it's a scam.
            HTTPS://www.tax.service.gov.uk/ident...ation/question

            I've just now looked at that address and thought Oh Dear, it is a scam because all Gov web sites start with www.gov.uk . . . . . not www.tax.service.gov.uk . . . . . .
            So I started the process again, from gov.uk and followed all the links to 'pay CGT".
            Again I got the tax.service.gov.uk address. I think it is a genuine web address. What do you think?
            If you don't travel first class, your children will . . . . . .

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              #7
              Originally posted by jayjay View Post
              It's been this way with banks and building societies for a year or two now. When buying the little Skamper, I had to go for an interview with the manager and take all the relevant paperwork, a printout of the advertisement, any email conversations printed out, etc. All to prove I was dealing with a real live person... That was at a building society and a few years ago! But I believe the banks are just as cautious.
              One big trouble with buying / selling motorhomes is that they generally cost over £10,000 and no dealer is allowed to accept more than £10k in cash. Then you have to use a bank, and their transaction-prevention schemes kick in big time. Luckily when we bought our last motorhome, for about £35k the dealer took our cards / driving licences and phoned the bank who authorised it so we had no bother.
              Interview with a bank manager? You 'avin' a laff? When did you last see a bank manager? (or a bank, come to that) They must have had a weak 'manager-seeing-prevention-customer-assistant' person.

              I've got to try to see someone at the bank this morning as I am now treasurer of my motorbike club and so far all efforts to get me linked to the bank account have failed. It's not Nationwide, it's another bank so I am slightly hopeful that they might talk to me. Their computer sent me an email saying it has sent a security code to my phone and I must input it here in this box within 24 hours. I never got the text to my phone so that's failed.
              If you don't travel first class, your children will . . . . . .

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