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Quick tyre pressure question!

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    #16
    A quote from #12

    "It’s best to use your personal tire gauge versus those available attached to air hoses at service stations. Of all the pressure gauges out there, they’re the most likely to be weathered, and possibly inaccurate."

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      #17
      #14 My motorbike has only 50 horse powers and a well rounded back tyre.....one has to overcome the (natural) fear of leaning...
      Last edited by NiedrigerIQ; 10-05-2018, 06:41 AM.

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        #18
        OT

        main-qimg-8e1b1c918db06b9350a1e567a03656ce-c.jpeg

        tyre pressure more important on motorbikes, even more with mixed use, street versa off road....hence my interest into...the mind tells one to stay at an angle like the middle pic, as that is the max leaning angle for the human body when running.....right pic needs training...

        end OT
        Last edited by NiedrigerIQ; 10-05-2018, 06:58 AM.

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          #19
          Andrew. further to your Halfords extending bar thingy. I have this and as a check went and tried on the van wheels. lo and behold the nuts are a different size! had to rob my socket set to suit. could have been embarrassing.
          Last edited by doog; 10-05-2018, 07:18 AM.

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            #20
            The problem with not using a torque wrench is that faults may not show up for a long time after. When a set of alloy wheels starts to show cracks around the bolt holes some thousands of miles later the comment will invariably be that the wheels were rubbish. I've yet to hear an engineer faced with a failed component to blame himself for not tightening the bolts properly.
            It's quite a contentious issue in the cycling world since the use of cast alloy and more recently carbon fibre parts have come into use.
            Il dolce far niente.

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              #21
              Yes as doog says you need to have the correct socket! I keep the correct socket attached to the wheel brace in the van.
              This is the Halfords thing I was talking about:
              http://www.halfords.com/workshop-too...eel-nut-wrench
              For that tool, you won't need an extension as it has a bend at the wheel end. This tool is what I use.

              But as jon says, if you want to be specific you could use a torque wrench:
              http://www.halfords.com/workshop-too...ench-model-100
              Make sure the required torque is within the scope of the torque wrench before you buy it. You will also need the correct size socket and probably a 1/2 inch drive extension.

              Don't get a 3/8" drive torque wrench, it won't be up to the torque required.
              Then also all the threads must be clean and dry which is what is specified in the torque specification.

              I suspect that the cracking of the alloy wheels that jon refers to might be just on cars that give their alloy wheels lots of abuse, like rallying or something. It wouldn't apply to steel wheels I am sure. Correct me if I'm wrong, obviously, and I think they would be over tightened considerably to get cracked.

              Proper Professional garages use these sockets. They are built so that they bend when the specified torque is reached and are colour coded for different torques:
              https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ken-Tool-...AAAMXQC-tTGSq~
              You can get them either singly for the specific job in hand or as a set. I guess you don't need a set!

              suivez l'aventure

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                #22
                New vehicles invariably include a wheel brace of a length calculated to prevent over-tightening wheel nuts, while at the same time long enough for the average driver to be able to tighten the nuts adequately.
                Over tightening can be just as dangerous as undertightening, so do not jump on the standard wrench if you wish to stay alive!.
                Jim.
                Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by jondxxx View Post
                  The problem with not using a torque wrench is that faults may not show up for a long time after. When a set of alloy wheels starts to show cracks around the bolt holes some thousands of miles later the comment will invariably be that the wheels were rubbish. I've yet to hear an engineer faced with a failed component to blame himself for not tightening the bolts properly.
                  It's quite a contentious issue in the cycling world since the use of cast alloy and more recently carbon fibre parts have come into use.
                  Reason I got the torque wrench for our bicyles were the aluminium parts as you say......carbon I still shy away from...on our bikes...
                  Last edited by NiedrigerIQ; 10-05-2018, 09:53 PM.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Twolitre View Post
                    New vehicles invariably include a wheel brace of a length calculated to prevent over-tightening wheel nuts, while at the same time long enough for the average driver to be able to tighten the nuts adequately.
                    Yes, for short time use at reduced speed....!

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by jayjay View Post
                      Ta, gasgas ! Can I have a star for being a good girl then?



                      Now - has anyone got a torque wrench? and can bring one to the rally. The engineer says I need to get one and learn how to use it, and I was going to, but I just didn't know what wrench I needed (alloy wheels) and put that to one side last year, then completely forgot! I'm supposed to re-torque the bolts on the caravan tyres after 50 miles... I guess that will be 80 miles tomorrow!
                      Keep an eye open in Lidel and Aldi they sell a very good torque wrench in a black case with an extension and sockets which fit common size wheel nuts 17, 19, 21 mm. Fairly simple to use - if you can put air in tyres you can set a torque wrench. Here are the instructions on Youtube
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AriiR1i0DmI

                      Jon
                      Amor omnia vincit et nos cedamus amori
                      https://smallromahome2oldies1largedo...logspot.co.uk/

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Thanks for that, Jon. I will keep an eye open.
                        Well after 160 miles there and back, the wheels are still where they are supposed to be!

                        And the 2lb tyre pressure shortfall made absolutely no difference to the way it handled either.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Hi JJ first you need to know what to torque the wheel nuts too ie ft pounds or metre kgs . if you want to I will bring mine next time we meet if you remind me.years ago I used to have 21/2 ft of 1ins conduit under the seat OOO a hidden weapon some one is saying. no tool of the trade very handy .I dont now the physics but the hotter the tyre the higher the pressure.thats why the book in the dash says chehech tyres when cold not only do they get hot in the sun but friction of the contact with the road raises the temp..
                          BuzznDave

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Correct tyre pressures will ensure maximum tyre life. Obviously a significant fact for the "working class" motorists.Tyre pressures which are too low allow the tyre tread to "shuffle" - increasing tyre wear by abrasion. And tyre pressures too high will concentrate the wear on the centre of the tyre tread thus shortening the tyre life.
                            Tyres can withstand a little pressure variation up or down from the manufacturer's recommendation. A variation of two or trhree Psi cannot be so critical or delivery drivers would be clogging up the nearest tyre inflator facilities every time they dropped off or picked up a parcel or a load.
                            Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Twolitre View Post
                              A variation of two or trhree Psi cannot be so critical or delivery drivers would be clogging up the nearest tyre inflator facilities every time they dropped off or picked up a parcel or a load.
                              Probably the last thing a delivery driver would think of...

                              https://www.theguardian.com/business...don-lane-death

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Motorbike dispatch riders (which use there own bikes normally) might see it different..

                                the following a pdf download, so think before click..

                                https://www.google.be/url?sa=t&sourc...Yj_tT6kGCyOfwg

                                Anyway, due to our usage (long distance, 3/4 loaded) I tend to stay a tad below the recommended tyre pressure when max loaded from the manufacturer of our car.....not that I let pressure off when doing a short drive (which happens very rarely) with an empty car... I agree with you there...
                                Last edited by NiedrigerIQ; 18-05-2018, 12:52 AM.

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