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    Caravan brochure

    Saw this on ebay. Great brochure and so is the car boat Pam

    #2
    Cor Pam! Well spotted! I've never seen one of those in my lifetime.

    Can't say it would appeal to me these days - you have to mount the boat on the chassis before you can tow it anywhere? I just hate all the coupling up bit of caravanning, I can't imagine having to pull the caravan onto the chassis before I could do that! LOL!!

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      #3
      There are still one or two around known very imaginatively as Caraboat!
      It was/is not necessary to remove wheels etc., just back them into the water. I have only ever seen one on the water and the driver was sat on the roof with his legs dangling in the doorway steering with a long pole attached to the outboard motor. I imagine that was very uncomfortable, but the only way he could see where he was going!
      I don't think they were very successful as boats.
      I think I am going to Google "Caraboats to see what comes up.
      Jim.
      Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

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        #4
        Caraboat

        This came up.

        http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=2420

        Rather more modern than the ones I remember. But still not very!

        And this:-

        http://www.bbc.co.uk/nottingham/cont..._feature.shtml

        Jim.
        Last edited by Twolitre; 25-05-2011, 19:31.
        Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

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          #5
          Nice one Pam!

          It gets a mention of page 40 of Caravans The Illustrated History from 1960 by Andrew Jenkinson.

          'The Amphibian Otter tourer, made in very small numbers from 1957-1966, was considered a novelty, but the Amphibian company was joined in this market by Glider, the old established Northants company. Apart from a Slipstream tourer range, Glider launched a 16ft amphibious model called the Carafloat. Glider finally stopped production in 1967 after 30 years.

          Creighton, the Nelson-based company which made clubman tourers, also added an amphibious tourer to its range, called the Gull (probably the best-looking of all amphibious vans, though the purchaser had to pay an extra £100 for the outboard motor). The amphibious tourer sank without a trace (pun intended) with only a brief attempt by a small maker, Caraboat in Mansfield Notts to reloat the idea.'
          Mary

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