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    Self Build Fiat Doblo Article

    I have now added some excellent pictures to the Self Build Fiat Doblo article, you can view the article and the pictures here:

    http://smallmotorhome.co.uk/selfbuilddoblo.html
    Graham
    Did you know you can follow us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter or you can visit us at our Website

    #2
    WoW
    Cracking jobby there,
    Makes my recycled chest of drawers look rweal crappy now,
    Love the porta potty rollout setup,

    Might have to go back to the drawing board now
    Love it, any more detailed pics, graham?
    If mistakes are the foundation of understanding, i have firm foundation,Underpinned by much in the way of I don't want to do that again

    Comment


      #3
      Hi Pete

      Paul Winch who did the conversion and who sent me the article and pics isn't on the forum and that's all the pictures he has sent me.
      Graham
      Did you know you can follow us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter or you can visit us at our Website

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        #4
        Very nice

        Comment


          #5
          Many innovative ideas there!

          Comment


            #6
            Doblo7

            Hello! I'm one of the "Contemporary Gypsies" of the article of that name, and Graham says I should put in an appearance on this Forum.

            I've been seeking a discussion with owners of Doblo camping vans, specifically those who do it themselves, for many months. The established self-build motorhome forum currently has no Doblo owners in touch, and no builders of other small motorhomes - if there are any still active in the membership - contribute to the discussions. We seem to be a different breed.

            Some of the issues I have raised occur in large motorhomes but the techniques and even philosophy tend to be different. I have likened the difference to building a watch - or at least a traveling clock, to the construction of a grandfather clock.

            As you see the project is well advanced and it progresses daily. Issues have included the following (and some remain):
            1) drop down vents (resolved with the help of the local garage),
            2) roof vents (the Smev required fixed 100cm2 is absurd),
            3) gas installation practice (everyone seems to be in the dark on this one),
            4) the Fiat "p" (the caption to my picture 3 refers),
            5) installation of a diesel heater in such a small vehicle (I'll have to add a shoehorn to my tool box),
            6) insurance / customs / police / DVLA (an adventure to come - currently the Doblo is taxed and insured as a car),
            7) out of interest, other layouts adopted by Doblo converters, professional and amateur. Obviously, we are now committed to our layout and the option of travelling in Modes 1,2 or 3 has already proved extremely useful. But what gets into our Doblo boot occupies two rooms in our house, so Modes 2 and 3 are preferred when we don't need to use the vehicle as a van!

            I think this is enough to be going along with. Paul.
            Last edited by Doblo7; 26-09-2011, 21:50. Reason: error
            Seek to make a virtue of necessity.

            Comment


              #7
              I'd be interested to see if you manage to fit a diesel heater into your Doblo. Earlier this year I was looking to adapt a Doblo car myself but there were too many complications eg finding an insurer who would accept an Eberspacher installation (only one would and this was a referral case). Insurers also would not accept an ex-disability vehicle without rear seats with the wheelchair ramped removed.

              I would have only been doing an adaptation ie with no fixed gas installation or cooking facility so it couldn't be insured as either a motorhome or a car.

              Eventually I concluded it was easier to simply to a basic fitting of a van instead as insurance policies are more flexible on commercial vehicles. Insurers would also accept an Eberspacher heater installation although this remains academic because my van has a petrol engine!

              I'm still open-minded re my next vehicle which may be another Kangoo, a Berlingo or a Doblo. The only definite is that it will be a van and not a car to keep more options open.

              I look forward to seeing how your ingenious adaptation progresses.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Paul Winch View Post
                Hello! I'm one of the "Contemporary Gypsies" of the article of that name, and Graham says I should put in an appearance on this Forum.

                Hi Paul,

                Welcome to the forum, I knew I would entice you on eventually.
                Graham
                Did you know you can follow us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter or you can visit us at our Website

                Comment


                  #9
                  Doblo7

                  You've obviously done your research, Karen, and your "project" and mine (putative in your case, actual in mine) have run in parallel.
                  You mention greater flexibility with a van rather than a car or MPV, but that is on the assumption that you remove the rear seat of an MPV. As you see we keep ours in situ and we frequently use it. So in our case insurers may be perfectly happy to classify the vehicle as an MPV which it manifestly is, at least in the literal sense.
                  The windows essential to an MPV are an asset most of the time, but not at night and not in Winter with a heater (in our case, if we fit one). The problem is condensation. Heat loss won't be a problem with the heater running (plus or minus 1 kilowatt is more than ample) but it means the vehicle will cool off more quickly than the equivalent van side if insulated.
                  In my idle moments I doodle a mwb Fiat Ducato (no intention of converting one) and my guiding principles would be a separate (though communicating) cab, full insulation of the rest of the vehicle including the bulkhead to the cab, and double glazed plastic windows.
                  The Romahome I've seen achieves these objectives on a smaller scale. I'm on this site because I saw one in a local car park and the owner introduced herself, showed me over (which consisted of looking through the back door) and told me to enter "small motorhome" in Google.
                  Best wishes - I'll be interested to follow your putative or actual progress. Paul.
                  Seek to make a virtue of necessity.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Paul Winch View Post
                    I'm on this site because I saw one in a local car park and the owner introduced herself, showed me over (which consisted of looking through the back door) and told me to enter "small motorhome" in Google.
                    Well, whoever that lady was thankyou for spreading the word.
                    Graham
                    Did you know you can follow us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter or you can visit us at our Website

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Eberspacher do a petrol,version (or used to) and an eberspacher could possibly be fitted under the bonnet as on Mercedes vans.

                      Peter

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