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    Ebay find.

    I always fancied one of these from the day they were introduced.But they were only available new as a "kit car" (or should that be "kit motorhome"?) project.
    Only about 30 were ever sold as "kit" projects. How many were ever completed is anyones guess.
    However, this ready built, but rather dilapidated one came up on ebay. It looked quite rescueable (is that a word?) so I had a bid.
    I thought a "grand" would probably secure it so I entered a maximum bid of £1200. I could not afford more anyway since I have just this week spent over £3000 on a modern (3 wheeler) motor scooter more in keeping with my age than my motorbikes.
    Such a disappointment! Just click the link and see what it fetched, with quite a lot of TLC required.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/3313003781...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

    Jim.
    Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

    #2
    Ha ! You will never grow old Jim,its all in the mind. See you soon chum
    Young men sow wild oats.Old men grow sage.

    Comment


      #3
      I looked at them once. All you get is a cortina with a fibreglass back. Inside all you can do is cover it with carpet. The one I looked at was a typical DIY job using stuff from B&Q, it quite put me off. As with the Austin Metro that I hired for a day when it was launched, I have never wanted one since.
      Don't fret 2l, you aren't missing anything.
      What you want is the first picture in this listing:
      http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PEUGEOT-TA...3D331300378159

      But it turns out the seller has posted the first picture by mistake. The actual one for sale looks good enough though.
      Blessed are those who find wisdom, those who gain understanding. Proverbs 3

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by gasgas View Post
        I looked at them once. All you get is a cortina with a fibreglass back. Inside all you can do is cover it with carpet. The one I looked at was a typical DIY job using stuff from B&Q, it quite put me off. As with the Austin Metro that I hired for a day when it was launched, I have never wanted one since.
        Don't fret 2l, you aren't missing anything.
        What you want is the first picture in this listing:...............................
        [url]http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PEUGEOT-TALBOT-CAMPERVAN-LEFT-HAND-DRIVE/.
        Strange looking layout ....

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by gasgas View Post
          I looked at them once. All you get is a cortina with a fibreglass back. Inside all you can do is cover it with carpet. The one I looked at was a typical DIY job using stuff from B&Q, it quite put me off. As with the Austin Metro that I hired for a day when it was launched, I have never wanted one since.
          Don't fret 2l, you aren't missing anything.
          What you want is the first picture in this listing:
          http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PEUGEOT-TA...3D331300378159

          But it turns out the seller has posted the first picture by mistake. The actual one for sale looks good enough though.
          Well off the mark gasgas!
          The only Cortina parts in this are the engine and gearbox. Even the rear axle and front suspension are from elsewhere. The original Cortina body was TOTALLY scrapped and only parts as chosen by the builder re-used from the original vehicle. No chance of base vehicle corrosion as mentioned so much recently on here.
          As for the internals:- very much in the hands of the builder as with those people converting Trannys etc. With the standard being up to the convertor.
          I cannot get your link to work so I have no idea what "Peugeot-Talbot" has to do with this.
          The life span of the Rancher is basically the life span of GRP. As long as mechanical maintenance is kept up.
          I am sure that only one RANCHER was listed, Though I know that the same vendor had a RANGER (saloon) in black listed at the same time.
          Jim.
          Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

          Comment


            #6
            Jim-
            What engine does this one have? It looks inside like an Autosleeper but the outside paintwork doesn't.
            I hope you can get this link to work.
            http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/vw-t25-cam...item27eaa9c92c

            Might be worth sticking an engine in?
            Blessed are those who find wisdom, those who gain understanding. Proverbs 3

            Comment


              #7
              The first picture of the link you couldn't get was a Citroen H van. They make fabulous trade vans for burger stalls etc.
              Blessed are those who find wisdom, those who gain understanding. Proverbs 3

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by gasgas View Post
                Jim-
                What engine does this one have? It looks inside like an Autosleeper but the outside paintwork doesn't.
                I hope you can get this link to work.
                http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/vw-t25-cam...item27eaa9c92c

                Might be worth sticking an engine in?
                Presumably a VW engine, though I am not interested enough to find out.
                The Rickman is the ONLY motorhome I desire. It is so similar in design and construction/durability to my Romini! I have friends with Rickman cars, similarly built and they are well satisfied.
                Many of the others are clever and expensive and by the time they drop to a price I can afford on my pension they are almost ready for scrapping anyway.
                The Rickman IS THE ONE THAT I WANT and I know exactly how they are constructed AND their life span. Which is probably as good as my Romini (and my Gentry which is 30 years old).

                Incidentally, your links appear in blue - and work, in my email notification, but come out black and non-responsive on the forum thread. Maybe it is some system you are using?

                Jim.
                Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I know that I am splitting hairs Jim but I am sure that both the Ranger and the Rancher were Ford Escort based but you are spot on when you say that it is only the mechanicals that are used and the body is thrown away.

                  I am curious as to why they used a Bedford Midi rear axle and not the standard Escort one.

                  I have looked at both the Ranger and the Rancher with envy over the years. I thought about building one of them when they were first brought out and then at second hand ones but I think that I will stick to restoring my 56 year old Land Rover.

                  Peter

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I believe that engine and transmission could be a "mix" of many different engines and gearboxes etc. But the front suspension could only be Escort.
                    The versions I know of all have Ford 2 litre engines from Cortinas.
                    It was half a life-time ago, but I did go quite deeply into details before family and financial influences scuppered it.
                    But then memory begins to suffer in the second half of the "life-time".
                    Jim.

                    By the way I too wondered about the rear axle. Even if it only scuppered the speedo read-out which for Fords was almost universally correct at 1000 cable turns per mile while other makes varied.
                    Last edited by Twolitre; 31-08-2014, 09:20.
                    Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Interested in the "Rickman" name , alongside something fibreglass .................

                      In one's youth , one fell off motocross bikes a bit, for far too many years when one could have been doing a proper job......
                      And the Rickman brothers of New Milton, Don and Derek, were to all us young lads heroes. Brilliant riders, they designed, created and built the Metisse marque, which dominated the world of motocross for a good few years. They supplied kits to begin with, for mainly Triumph or Matchless engines, but others were soon shoehorned in. They were the first to use fibreglass in a big way, and later injected plastic, on competition machines.
                      They were also the first to fit a disc brake.
                      Their tanks, mudguards, side panels were instantly recognisable, and coupled with the first frames designed for the specific demands of motocross, these beautiful looking machines were a revelation, and (for then) a lot lighter. And having had one, I can testify they handling like a dream.
                      'Course, you still fell of them, but you looked so much more elegant doing it ..........

                      They branched out into all sorts of fibreglass objects, including, I believe, something to do with the fibreglass bodied "Grand Tourer" which I seem to recall was cooked up by the Reliant factory ! ( They gave one to one of the royals, can't remember which one)
                      So I just wonder if this is another example of their projects ? They were certainly the first motocross riders to make a good bit of cash out of the sport, so it wouldn't surprise me !
                      Last edited by rugmike; 31-08-2014, 17:03.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Same firm, but by no means GRP pioneers. GRP boats were around long before that.
                        The story goes, though I have no proof, that a deal with a Communist country went sour when Rickmen thought they were just to supply body shells and chassis' while the buyer expected all other necessary parts to be included.
                        I have no proof of this, but the story was circulating at the time Rickman brothers qwent out of business.
                        Jim.
                        Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Twolitre View Post
                          Same firm, but by no means GRP pioneers. GRP boats were around long before that.
                          The story goes, though I have no proof, that a deal with a Communist country went sour when Rickmen thought they were just to supply body shells and chassis' while the buyer expected all other necessary parts to be included.
                          I have no proof of this, but the story was circulating at the time Rickman brothers qwent out of business.
                          Jim.
                          Sounds strange enough to be true !
                          Yes, GRP had been about a goodwhile - I well remember articles showing you how to make your own boat/motorcycle fairing/garden table - any results I saw looked pretty dodgy !
                          The Rickman's innovation initially was to see the benefits of both making stuff for competition that worked superbly, but also looked pretty amazing - and began to make real cash when they began making their own frames for sale to the racing community at home and on the Continental circuit.
                          All backed, of course, by their winning ways, riding their own products ..... called "Metisse" - mongrel !

                          Up to then, the most common "bitzas" were based on BSA frames, Triumph or AMC motors, AMC gearbox, and a pair of Norton forks with an AMC front hub - and a lot of midnight oil ..... ah, I can see my first one now !

                          Metisse bike kits could come with all the fibreglass kit, revolutionary 531 frame, engine plates for engine of choice, and, for the really go-ahead, continental forks. They cut out a lot of hassle, and handled like you couldn't believe. And they just looked amazing.
                          (Their first "complete" machine was for the 250cc class with a 200cc Bultaco engine, that achieved great success due to it's light weight - called, appropriately enough, the "Petite" Metisse).

                          Most of us went for the frame, tank and plates, then saved up hard for the rest....:bicycle:

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I'm not sure about what "revolutionary 531 frame" means.
                            Unless the application of Reynolds 531 tubing to motorcycle frames was considered revolutionary.
                            I had a Viking pedal cycle around 1954 built with 531 tubing. Extemely light and strong.
                            Jim.
                            Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Twolitre View Post
                              I'm not sure about what "revolutionary 531 frame" means.
                              Unless the application of Reynolds 531 tubing to motorcycle frames was considered revolutionary.
                              I had a Viking pedal cycle around 1954 built with 531 tubing. Extemely light and strong.
                              Jim.
                              Sorry, perhaps I should have been more precise - "revolutionary frame, designed specifically for motocross and made from Reynolds 531 tubing, with oil-in-frame, QD adjustable swinging arm and chain adjustment, enclosed centre box section air box, and needle roller bearing races; engine mounting plates for a range of power units and gearboxes, and replaceable fibre glass tank, centre section and seat housing, with rear mudguard housing."

                              Suddenly, it was a whole new ball game.

                              (The only frame structure that had as much comparable technology was the Greeves frame, made for 250cc engines, with a massive aluminium front member, not exactly renowned for its handling capabilities, due to the steering geometry. It flexed like an elastic band, although I did ride one with a Triumph engine that flexed like a piece of floppy string.)

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