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  • llywelyn1984
    replied
    I agree with the thread.
    I'm usually the smallest thing on site yet often get charged the same as giant rvs! I won't go to sites who charge for showers as I hate fiddling for change and her indoors always requires two tokens in indoor to wash her hair.

    I can't wait until I get unit with a shower they I'll never have to speak or leave it except to get water!

    Her indoors also often gets suckered into the fire pits which is often 10 quid.

    However having tried cheap sites I find it's always a bad idea! I also love a little on site shop.

    Leave a comment:


  • NiedrigerIQ
    replied
    As a part time dog owner/carer I always find a roll of stylish dog poo bags in my backpacks, my jackets and who nows where, even after the dog has already left us......to be with its owner....

    Got some in animal prints, like zebra, leopard etc.......the dog does not care....about them bags....

    I do find it amazing that there are other non dog owners carrying dog poo bags as well......

    These ones are right down my street

    https://www.google.be/search?q=dog+p...814x7ddUTuYbM:

    I would be offended if verbally abused when offering one of those....to somebody in need....

    As for radios and TV's.....can't they just stay at home....? Even when on low volume..they disturb me.....turning down...no!...switch it off completely or use headphones...

    When encountering a bar or pub with a TV in, a flickering one, I am straight out as well....can't have it......plastic chairs is another no go for me....can't have that either.....

    Kind of strange...what I morphed into, over the years...
    Last edited by NiedrigerIQ; 26-06-2017, 22:58.

    Leave a comment:


  • emmerson
    replied
    Lots of good stuff in this thread, most of which I agree with. But no-one has mentioned noisy radios and televisions. Last month on site in Belgium I had occasion to, very politely, ask my neighbour to turn her radio down. This she did, with much bad grace, and never spoke to me again!
    Re dogs, I class myself as a responsible dog-lover (note: dog-lover, not owner: there is a subtle difference), and always carry poo-bags. If I see a dog dumping but being ignored, I offer the owner a bag, and suggest they pick it up. Most do, but I have been verbally abused on more than one occasion.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Sitter
    replied
    Originally posted by gasgas View Post
    While we are by now a million miles away from the original topic, I would like to add that several car garages I know of don't know anything about cars, such as what 25 thou as a spark gap looks like. Or that engines need oil, apparently. They just plug the car into the garage computer and do what the computer says. For example BMW had a computer program that told the spotty moron to drain the engine oil, but not to put fresh oil back in later. That cost BMW thousands of new V8 engines because spotty moron technicians didn't replace the oil they had drained. I had an unfortunate episode with a Nissan main franchised dealer that had the gall to tell me they hadn't changed my spark plugs because my car had a diesel engine. They can't even tell the difference between a petrol engine and a diesel engine. Now, the main Mercedes dealer in Leicester cannot give me a price for servicing my 25 year old car because it doesn't have a computer to tell them what to do, and they don't know how long it will take to do the work listed in their own service schedule.
    So much for computerised cars.
    Shall we stick to the topic now?
    I don't suppose that they can shoe horses either and they were once the main form of transport. I sometimes think when I hear all the moans about new technology etc that I'm listening to my father who didn't think anything good had been invented,designed or manufactured since about 1930. He almost drove me mad too. All I know is that I'm nearly 73 years old and as far as I know fit and healthy, technology has played its part in keeping me that way. If I compare my quality of life with a 73 year old of the 1940s and 50s there is no comparison they were probably comparable to a present day 90 year old at least. Technology will continue to advance and we will get left behind that is the nature of things. I have a simple solution when I don't understand I phone my Techy son it makes up for all the hours I spent trying to teach him "How to tie his shoelaces or use scissors", he is left handed and the rest of the family aren't. Increasingly I find I'm talking to my Grandson who assures me its simple Nan and rattles off the explanation. Frankly life is too short now to worry about it.

    Janet

    Leave a comment:


  • BrianTheSnail
    replied
    Cynthia - I tried, honestly, I tried. When I worked in the industry (for IBM) I started out on Quality Assurance and my penultimate role was in User Experience. In the first role I focused directly on improving the documentation and in the latter on trying to influence the design to fit the user's mental model of how they thought the (software) product ought work. Often something as subtle as changing the word we used to name some technical component made a big difference on whether the user had an understanding of what it might do, or not.

    Documentation is lamentable today. As you say there is an expectation that everyone will understand the basics of what the product does so only the details need documenting. If it is any consolation I spend much time tearing my hair out trying to get overviews of what some technology may do for me. Websites don't help - there seems to be am modern trend for stylish websites with gorgeous graphic design and large text full of soundbites explaining how brilliant the product us without explaining what it actually does.

    And don't get me started on the idea of manuals being on CD or downloadable PDF only. All products need a printed 2 or 3 page "basics" to get the user started. I know not printing manuals saves trees but when manuals or instructions are printed they are generally in 27 languages - why can't there be a purchase option with products from Amazon, Argos et al where you indicate language and the distributor prints a copy of the manual directly to add to the shipped package. Damn, I think there's a patent there.

    Leave a comment:


  • CyberCynth
    replied
    Originally posted by BrianTheSnail View Post
    Cynthia - modern speak is just like any other language, ruddy difficult to acquire as you get older. But, if you persevere, you can manage to the odd phrase now and again.

    The real secret is never to lose the three-year old inside you that persistently keeps asking "Why".

    Dapple - don't confuse technology with consumerism. We are currently undergoing a social revolution equal to (possibly greater than) the industrial revolution in the 18th century. Of course a side effect is much consumerist tat but no more than Sports Direct's 10,000 of trainers, all alike or Sainsbury's 500 brands of salad dressing. Consumerism is a by-product of the modern-age, not necessarily a by-product of the modern technological age.
    The thing that really rattles my cage Brian is this assumption of prior knowledge. When I tried to move into the 21st century with the purchase of a Nokia Smartphone I was completely baffled. A) Because there were no instructions in the box B) Because the instructions, when I did manage to locate them on line, and download them, (requiring a change of ink cartridges by the time the printer had finished!) I still didn't know what to do with many of the phone's functions. The instructions kept saying 'For this - do that' but they didn't tell me HOW to do that! I have given up and gone back to one of the tiny, cheap and cheerful basic mobiles that at least fit in your pocket. I can make calls and send texts. Sorted. If I want to take photos I have a very nice camera for that purpose.

    Dapple I'm confused now, as I don't know whether I'm a dinosaur or a curmudgeon. Maybe I'm a dinomudgeon... Or you could all just start calling me Victoria, being the female version of Victor (Meldrew)

    Oh, and to add to Andrew's grumbles about computers, my laptop 'updated' itself recently - it took 1 1/2hrs and now it's all sparkly and 'with it' my printer won't work, as the system has thrown out my Epson data. Great, thanks Microsoft.

    Sainsbury's 500 brands of salad dressing. And no doubt these plastic bottles all end up in landfill as the contents contaminate the plastic, allegedly, so that it can't be recycled. Grumble, grumble grumble.
    Cynthia.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dapple
    replied
    Originally posted by BrianTheSnail View Post

    Dapple - don't confuse technology with consumerism.
    Or vice-versa.

    Twitter and facebook are not technologies.

    They are the commercial exploitation of existing technology.

    The depths of their exploitation still not fathomed.

    Leave a comment:


  • BrianTheSnail
    replied
    Cynthia - modern speak is just like any other language, ruddy difficult to acquire as you get older. But, if you persevere, you can manage to the odd phrase now and again.

    The real secret is never to lose the three-year old inside you that persistently keeps asking "Why".

    Dapple - don't confuse technology with consumerism. We are currently undergoing a social revolution equal to (possibly greater than) the industrial revolution in the 18th century. Of course a side effect is much consumerist tat but no more than Sports Direct's 10,000 of trainers, all alike or Sainsbury's 500 brands of salad dressing. Consumerism is a by-product of the modern-age, not necessarily a by-product of the modern technological age.

    Leave a comment:


  • gasgas
    replied
    While we are by now a million miles away from the original topic, I would like to add that several car garages I know of don't know anything about cars, such as what 25 thou as a spark gap looks like. Or that engines need oil, apparently. They just plug the car into the garage computer and do what the computer says. For example BMW had a computer program that told the spotty moron to drain the engine oil, but not to put fresh oil back in later. That cost BMW thousands of new V8 engines because spotty moron technicians didn't replace the oil they had drained. I had an unfortunate episode with a Nissan main franchised dealer that had the gall to tell me they hadn't changed my spark plugs because my car had a diesel engine. They can't even tell the difference between a petrol engine and a diesel engine. Now, the main Mercedes dealer in Leicester cannot give me a price for servicing my 25 year old car because it doesn't have a computer to tell them what to do, and they don't know how long it will take to do the work listed in their own service schedule.
    So much for computerised cars.
    Shall we stick to the topic now?

    Leave a comment:


  • Dapple
    replied
    Originally posted by Graham View Post
    because you reach a certain age doesn't mean you have to become a dinosaur.
    And just because you have no interest in informing the world of your every move doesn't mean you are a dinosaur. There are plenty of reasons other than being an ageing curmudgeon not to be attracted to every new consumerist wonder that is rammed down our throats.

    I wouldn't even have been interested as a teenager.

    Perhaps I have always been an ageing curmudgeon. But I hope, never a dinosaur. I was after all an early user of the internet before there were any pictures. And for that matter, any commercialisation. It's not just about not wishing to try new things. More to do with being discriminating between which new things are of interest, and which are not.
    Last edited by Dapple; 18-06-2017, 20:03.

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  • CyberCynth
    replied
    Brian, that is all very well if you have a knowledgeable friend to whom you can turn when you get mired in the depths and confusion of modern technology. However, one problem that occurs for me time and again is that if I 'google' something that's causing me a problem, the answer is encased in modern-speak. It assumes a certain prior knowledge, which I do not possess.

    Back to square one.
    Cynthia.

    Leave a comment:


  • BrianTheSnail
    replied
    One of my heroes, a local friend has just died, a few weeks shy of his 90th birthday. Why was he a hero? He was a radio ham friend who still suffered from the child-like enjoyment of "finding out". He wanted to explore the latest technology, play with it, see what it did and if it was useful, embrace it.. He didn't have Twitter or Facebook accounts but he did have a den full of Arduino microcomputers - last year he persuaded me to teach an Arduino programming course to the club. He always had several unfinished projects on the workbench.

    I have another friend who phones occasionally (usually when he has a problem) - in his late eighties he decided he would use Linux not Windows and also explore Raspberry Pi computers. What he does might seem trivial to the average 20 year old but for someone well into his eighties represents major achievements of which he is justifiably proud.

    A third friend phones me almost daily with some trivial computer problem that is beyond his ken. Despite being a renowned professor he simply cannot cope with computers and the new world. Many of his amateur radios are still driven by valves and he is firmly mired in the past. Today's technology and the internet world merely exists just to frustrate him.

    Moral - life is more enjoyable if you accept that the world, particularly the computer and internet world ,is changing daily and is much more fun if you change with it, explore its challenges, ask questions - particularly of Google, and embrace it. Don't get stuck in the past.

    Leave a comment:


  • CyberCynth
    replied
    Originally posted by Graham View Post
    Haha, you've got me there Cynthia I do more U turns than Theresa May!

    We use Facebook and Twitter to promote our various enterprises and to get people to the relative safety and friendly environment of this forum.

    We have personal facebook accounts too but are very careful who we befriend, it is safe enough if you are careful about your privacy settings, my point to Andrew was to illustrate that because you reach a certain age doesn't mean you have to become a dinosaur.



    Too late! she cried. Don't know about Andrew but I've already become a useful specimen for palaeontologists to study.
    Cynthia.

    Leave a comment:


  • Graham
    replied
    Originally posted by NomadSue View Post
    AND advertise they are going away for a holiday or are already away. Please come and rob my house...

    Andrew, I am really sorry to hear about your daughter's dreadful experience.

    I admit to being a regular FB user, primarily as a means of keeping in touch with my 3 children' two of whom live abroad. Also to keep in touch with my various friends who live in Bolton, Trafford and other relatively distant places. But we would NEVER post that we were going away prior to the event. The nearest I get to that is personal messages by email or FB messages to my family.
    The thing is Sue that if you choose your friends carefully only they will see that you are away and as long as you haven't got friends who are burgalars you should be ok.

    You and Ian are my friends on Facebook along with a few others I trust not to ransack my house if I say I am away. Choose your fiends carefully, make sure your posts are only reaching friends and you'll be ok.

    Leave a comment:


  • NomadSue
    replied
    Originally posted by Graham View Post
    The brains of a teenager? If only we had the bodies to match.

    I'm really sorry to hear about your daughter Andrew what an awful experience. That is a prime example of why we should be careful of our privacy settings, I see lots of people (particularly youngsters) who's account is open for the world to see and they put really personal information on there and they accept anyone as a friend even if they don't know and have never met them.
    AND advertise they are going away for a holiday or are already away. Please come and rob my house...

    Andrew, I am really sorry to hear about your daughter's dreadful experience.

    I admit to being a regular FB user, primarily as a means of keeping in touch with my 3 children' two of whom live abroad. Also to keep in touch with my various friends who live in Bolton, Trafford and other relatively distant places. But we would NEVER post that we were going away prior to the event. The nearest I get to that is personal messages by email or FB messages to my family.

    Leave a comment:

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