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  • luke84
    replied
    Originally posted by BrianTheSnail View Post
    OK - I'm going wade into this and be both off topic and controversial. I am convinced I am deaf because of homeopathy* - there appears to be no scientific evidence to suggest it works - see https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/homeopathy/ or https://life.spectator.co.uk/article...icts-prove-it/ . Of course, try it if you like, but please, please do not make the mistake I did in believing my GP that it would work for a deteriorating condition.

    Before investing seriously in any of the alternate treatments Simon Singh's book is a good read. Of course, the placebo effect is incredibly strong and any alternate treatment, homeopathy included, might work for you but the science seems to suggest it is merely you, yourself, making you better rather than the treatment.

    * Some 30 odd years ago I had a discharge in mt left ear. Unbeknownst to me my local GP was a homeopath (the NHS allowed them in those days). For 12 months I was prescribed little white pills and ointment that, in effect contained no active treatment just some one molecule in a gazzillion dilution. My ear didn't improve. In desperation I suggested going to see someone privately who, after an initial examination booked me in for an operation the very next day, the problem was so severe! Basically I had a growth in the inner ear (probably a cholesteatoma) which was so large it was dangerous and needed immediate removal - a process so drastic that all the working components of that ear were removed with it leading me with zero hearing on my left side). I don't know for certain, but there are reasonable odds that had this been correctly diagnosed and treated 12 months earlier my hearing, or at least some of it, may have been saved.
    I’m so sorry to hear that. That is shocking...

    Leave a comment:


  • luke84
    replied
    Originally posted by Zippynomad View Post
    Hi Luke

    jon is probably right. If you are trying to stay below the radar you need something that definitely does not look like a camper van. A home converted van with no windows would do the trick. Have you tried homeopathy - cured my cousin of a serious case of IBS.

    Good luck.

    Zippy
    Thank you Zippy, this could be a very valid point. I don’t want people to ultimately know that I’m living in the van. A converted van could be ok but if it’s done properly, insulated and so on. I fear that insuring one I could end up paying premium too...

    Leave a comment:


  • Pauline
    replied
    Originally posted by NomadSue View Post
    BrianTheSnail Your post is one of those for which we could do with an alternative to the 'like' response. Am horrified that this is the cause of your deafness.

    Homeopathy provokes a lot of discussion. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/homeopathy/ Maybe deserves a separate thread?
    Agree, sometimes it's hard to 'like' something like that. Hopefully anyone will realise it's used more to acknowledge having read it and sympathise, in that instance.

    Leave a comment:


  • NomadSue
    replied
    BrianTheSnail Your post is one of those for which we could do with an alternative to the 'like' response. Am horrified that this is the cause of your deafness.

    Homeopathy provokes a lot of discussion. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/homeopathy/ Maybe deserves a separate thread?

    'Among the most common conditions that people seek homeopathic treatment for are:
    • asthma
    • ear infections
    • hay fever
    • mental health conditions, such as depression, stress and anxiety
    • allergies, such as food allergies
    • dermatitis (an allergic skin condition)
    • arthritis
    • high blood pressure

    There's no good-quality evidence that homeopathy is an effective treatment for these or any other health conditions.'


    Some people genuinely believe in its efficacy but I wouldn't like to trust such treatment to save my life.

    I bet quite a few of us know someone whose condition deteriorated badly as a result of putting their faith in such treatment, rather than trusting the traditional, scientific, doctor / hospital approach.

    Leave a comment:


  • BrianTheSnail
    replied
    OK - I'm going wade into this and be both off topic and controversial. I am convinced I am deaf because of homeopathy* - there appears to be no scientific evidence to suggest it works - see https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/homeopathy/ or https://life.spectator.co.uk/article...icts-prove-it/ . Of course, try it if you like, but please, please do not make the mistake I did in believing my GP that it would work for a deteriorating condition.

    Before investing seriously in any of the alternate treatments Simon Singh's book is a good read. Of course, the placebo effect is incredibly strong and any alternate treatment, homeopathy included, might work for you but the science seems to suggest it is merely you, yourself, making you better rather than the treatment.

    * Some 30 odd years ago I had a discharge in mt left ear. Unbeknownst to me my local GP was a homeopath (the NHS allowed them in those days). For 12 months I was prescribed little white pills and ointment that, in effect contained no active treatment just some one molecule in a gazzillion dilution. My ear didn't improve. In desperation I suggested going to see someone privately who, after an initial examination booked me in for an operation the very next day, the problem was so severe! Basically I had a growth in the inner ear (probably a cholesteatoma) which was so large it was dangerous and needed immediate removal - a process so drastic that all the working components of that ear were removed with it leading me with zero hearing on my left side). I don't know for certain, but there are reasonable odds that had this been correctly diagnosed and treated 12 months earlier my hearing, or at least some of it, may have been saved.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zippynomad
    replied
    Hi Luke

    jon is probably right. If you are trying to stay below the radar you need something that definitely does not look like a camper van. A home converted van with no windows would do the trick. Have you tried homeopathy - cured my cousin of a serious case of IBS.

    Good luck.

    Zippy

    Leave a comment:


  • Derekoak
    replied
    I do not believe it is acceptable to empty cassettes with any chemicals onto or into the ground or into toilets that are serviced by septic tanks (and how do you know which are? ) or or manholes which may be rainwater only (how do you know?) or really any toilet not designed for emptying cassettes. Visit a campsite or proper serviced aire every 3 days or whatever.

    Leave a comment:


  • Derekoak
    replied
    Originally posted by gasgas View Post
    Suppose your cassette is full. Suppose you are in a wilderness off the road somewhere. What do people think about digging a hole about 2ft deep and depositing your cassette contents in it, waiting for it to soak away and then refilling the hole? I expect some people will be repulsed, but what is the alternative, apart from seeking a camp site? Remember you are in a wilderness - which could be somewhere in Europe, I don't mean the Ghobi Desert - and there may not be a camp site within 100 miles. I don't mean by the side of the road in the UK in a layby. (Which is probably already half full of deposits that people have made left on the surface).
    The alternative is when you set off for wilderness stop using your motorhome toilet, even if it is full, seal it up until you get out of the wilderness to your campsite. Dig a hole somewhere like you have found above, only 6" deep, do your poo wipe with a minimum of paper (damp sphagnum moss is better) fill the hole. Leave the surface as you found it. That is our method we prefer to always be in wilderness (we dispense with the smelly motorhome loo all together.)
    Last edited by Derekoak; 18-08-2019, 15:52.

    Leave a comment:


  • BrianTheSnail
    replied
    We have been using bio washing liquid rather than the 'oriole blue loo stuff. I think that would be OK to leave soak away but I really wouldn't be happy with the blue stuff. My biggest worry would be being spotted and people seeing it as an act of littering/vandalism/desecration or whatever and so getting campervanners/motorhomers an even worse reputation and so less likely to find wild camping spots. Certainly when we were on Isla the local PC was mooting the possibility that restrictions might be sought on some of the dunes after a motorhome had left one of them distinctly blue!

    Leave a comment:


  • SandraM
    replied
    Depends on whether your fluid is green I suppose, or the non biological sort, otherwise the ground is contaminated with not just your effluent (which nature could deal with) but chemicals

    Leave a comment:


  • gasgas
    replied
    Suppose your cassette is full. Suppose you are in a wilderness off the road somewhere. What do people think about digging a hole about 2ft deep and depositing your cassette contents in it, waiting for it to soak away and then refilling the hole? I expect some people will be repulsed, but what is the alternative, apart from seeking a camp site? Remember you are in a wilderness - which could be somewhere in Europe, I don't mean the Ghobi Desert - and there may not be a camp site within 100 miles. I don't mean by the side of the road in the UK in a layby. (Which is probably already half full of deposits that people have made left on the surface).

    Leave a comment:


  • Graham
    replied
    I don’t think I’d be comfortable emptying a cassette toilet in a public toilet in a supermarket or anywhere else but then we only ever camp on campsites so I would never need to.

    Leave a comment:


  • Caz
    replied
    I see a lot that have no toilets - but have never seen one that only has one! Even our local tiny Tesco has two.

    I can't see why you "could be stopping someone's access when they really need the toilet." It's not as if you are going to be in there very long - probably less time to empty a cassette than to undress, sit down, do your business, wipe, get dressed again. (I haven't mentioned washing hands and drying them because obviously you would be doing that in both scenarios)

    After all, you have avoided taking up space in public toilets by using your own in the first place - so overall you have been less likely to stop anyone's access!

    Leave a comment:


  • NomadSue
    replied
    Originally posted by Caz View Post
    I have a RADAR key - it was in an old caravan I bought years ago. I keep it in my bag for use in emergency. I've used it twice in about 15 years, when I have been desperate and the main loos have been locked.

    Re emptying cassettes - no need to use a disabled toilet for that, there are plenty of large Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury, Morrison stores about which have toilets for public use, just carry it in in a large bag or trolley.

    ( I've never had to actually resort to doing that as I tend to go on a campsite at least once a week in UK, and of course a lot of the aires abroad have disposal facilities.)
    You are kidding! I am astounded and cannot imagine anyone doing that at any of our local supermarkets.

    Anyway, there is often only a single toilet (not always, admittedly) so you could be stopping someone's access when they really need the toilet.
    Last edited by NomadSue; 16-08-2019, 21:48.

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  • gasgas
    replied
    I have had no problems wheeling the cassette into Service Station toilets. I walk briskly and like to think that onlookers will just think it is some kind of posh wheely tool kit.

    Leave a comment:

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