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    insurance and fire extinguishers

    Whilst searching for motorhome insurance today I was informed by the representative that damage by fire in a camper is only covered if the motorhome/campervan has a fire extinguisher onboard. Was anybody else aware of this? Personally I have always preferred an asbestos blanket which is easy to use instinctively... and quite frankly anything greater than a lighted match and I would not consider attempting to put anything out, I would be legging it at rapid speed.

    Is this accurate information I am wondering, are others aware of this or am I just plain naive.

    Anyway meanwhile I am going to source a very cheap fire extinguisher to comply.

    #2
    Thanks, you have just reminded me why we have one in the van.

    When I was clearing out unused items the other day I nearly took it out as in the event of a fire I would do as instructed in my Fire Marshall courses and get out. Having failed to put out fires in a fire safety training exercise using a large extinguisher I would not hang around to find out whether the small one could cope.
    However I left it in as I knew we had bought it for a good reason.

    We also have a fire blanket, although I would only consider tackling a very small fire with it in the confines of an R20.

    I am pretty sure that it is mentioned in the insurance document* and I also seem to remember reading that some campsites require you to have them.

    * I just checked an old policy and can't see the reference. I will look at the current policy to check, or maybe it was in a quote from a different insurer.
    Last edited by Artoo02; 05-04-2014, 16:48. Reason: to add note
    Sue

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      #3
      Fire precautions at a site in Wales:

      If there is a fire, shout 'Fire' and ring the bell.

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        #4
        I was told by a fire officer many moons ago to get a fire blanket as the implement of choice......(this advice might be out of date but makes sense to me) that in an emergency people are flummoxed by extinguishers but people instinctively know how to use a fire blanket and it can be used in a variety of ways and over most common fires. He also said the best advice was unless very small to get the hell out.. and in a motorhome with a combination of gas and diesel.......... a 6 sec extinguisher is not going to do much. But I had no idea I would have invalid insurance cover eeeeek.

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          #5
          Just to update you, Clubcare insurance have a requirement for an extinguisher.
          We have one and it is still in date but I would use the fire blanket and/or get out in an emergency.

          I couldn't find reference to it in the Safeguard documentation and now think it was a requirement at one of the campsites we considered using.
          Sue

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            #6
            Just a query.
            Is a fire blanket not a fire extinguisher by definition? And do all/any insurances discriminate?

            Slightly different, but for a Boat Safety Certificate check (BSC) fire extinguishers are required to have very specific markings and fire blankets are also required.

            It might be useful to mention that the extinguishers labelled as required for boats are not available everywhere and while searching for one a few years ago I realised that prices for similar items varied significantly from shop to shop. I believe the required markings indicated them as particularly suitable for flammable items/materials found or carried in boats and maybe also reflected the fact that people can be trapped on boats on fire.
            I eventually found what I wanted at Wicks where their prices seemed significantly the best value for such items.
            Jim.
            Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

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              #7
              Interesting thread - must read my insurance docs. Have a fire extinguisher but no idea if it is in date. Where would I put a fire blanket (so that it would be always accessible) in a C15???

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                #8
                Originally posted by Twolitre View Post
                Just a query.
                Is a fire blanket not a fire extinguisher by definition?
                Very good point Jim, it certainly is!

                I'd rather have a fire blanket, it could be used not only to quash a small fire to help stop it spreading but also if someone was on fire themselves. A fire extinguisher wouldn't be good to use on a person.

                Having said that my first thought would be to get out and as far from a burning van as possible.
                ______________
                Guardian of the Ducks
                2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Quack!

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Twolitre View Post
                  Just a query.
                  Is a fire blanket not a fire extinguisher by definition? ...
                  I see your point Jim but I doubt the insurers agree, and I imagine "m'learned friends" have been consulted.

                  I've just Googled "define fire extinguisher". Lots of results but Collins Dictionary is pretty typical:-

                  "A portable device for extinguishing fires, usually consisting of a canister with a directional nozzle used to direct a spray of water, chemically generated foam, inert gas, or fine powder onto the fire."
                  Geoff

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Artoo0 View Post
                    I see your point Jim but I doubt the insurers agree, and I imagine "m'learned friends" have been consulted.

                    I've just Googled "define fire extinguisher". Lots of results but Collins Dictionary is pretty typical:-

                    "A portable device for extinguishing fires, usually consisting of a canister with a directional nozzle used to direct a spray of water, chemically generated foam, inert gas, or fine powder onto the fire."
                    The word "usually" leaves that wide open!
                    It does not really define a "fire-extinguisher".

                    I am only playing "devil's advocate here" but..................

                    Jim.
                    Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

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                      #11
                      As there seems to be only two or three pounds difference between them I don't think I could be bothered arguing the toss with the insurers, much less risking losing that argument!

                      In fact we have both in the van. The blanket has a Power Hook upside down on the back and hangs from the pelmet. I think we posted a photo back when we were newbies.

                      I'll happily admit that I'd be far more likely to use the blanket if necessary than the squirty thing.
                      Geoff

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                        #12
                        Hanging from the pelmet - hadn't thought of that - did you fix a screw into pelmet or something?

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                          #13
                          I was searching on Google to find out if my insurers required me to have a fire extinguisher, I haven't found that out yet, but I did find this:

                          http://www.caravanguard.co.uk/news/a...rom-fire-4206/

                          I thought it might be useful, because it explains the different usage of a fire blanket and a canister, which I didn't know.

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                            #14
                            Hmmmmmmmmmm. Thanks VonUK.
                            Perhaps the definition of a fire extinguisher needs to include the TYPE of fire being considered?
                            Jim.
                            Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              That was a very informative link, thankyou! The other thing to bear in mind is that extinguishers can deteriorate over time. We bought one years ago, when we were living in a caravan, thinking it was a one-off purchase, but after a couple of years it had had it. Good idea to get one with a gauge, as that will give some indication as to its state of readiness. I suppose that is why companies seem to have somebody visit annually to do checks and replace as necessary.
                              Last edited by maddy; 14-05-2014, 09:52. Reason: spelling :(

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