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Beware of Admiral Insurance

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    Beware of Admiral Insurance

    I flew up to Glasgow yesterday to buy a car I saw on ebay. It turned out to be a real cracker, 178,000 miles and inside was just like brand new. I had an old policy with Admiral insurance so I called them because they held the NCB for a previous policy I had not renewed. I took out the insurance, in spite of the nauseating 'upselling' of the oik on the other end of the phone. He was bleating on about how I must pay extra for this and for that: 'why don't I want to pay extra for breakdown cover?' 'The last time I broke down was in 1972, I diagnosed an ignition problem, walked to the car shop, bought a coil and fitted it. Problem solved. I don't need breakdown cover'. On and on it went, 'you must pay extra for legal cover'. 'I have been buying insurance since 1966 and never made a claim. I have passed my IAM exam: I use my eyes for observation and avoid accidents. I don't need legal cover. I can tell if a car has not seen me so I don't put myself in front of it'.
    Anyway I agreed to take the insurance. I was in the car, about to drive 350 miles home.
    When I got the documentation I was disturbed to find that if I had not told them about any modifications the insurance would not be valid. Modifications in their documentation means anything that was not standard on the car. How do I know what was standard on a car in 1993? The radio wouldn't be, obviously, nor the sunroof. What about the upholstery? I know that Mercedes had several levels of upholstery costing extra above the basic standard stuff. How do I know if mine is a deviation from standard? I didn't realise till I read the small print that they count Alloy Wheels as a modification. I had not told them about the alloy wheels so presumably I am not insured. They gave me a very strong impression that any thing like that would invalidate the insurance.
    THEN came the real crunch, something I have never seen anywhere else before:
    [I]
    Several Liability Notice:
    The Authorised Insurers will each have 'subscribed' or agreed to cover a proportion of Your Insurance and their obligations will be limited to the proportion that they have agreed to cover. This means that, if there are for example three insurers who have agreed to cover 10%, 30% and 60% of your insurance respectively then each insurer is only responsible for the percentage of cover that it has agreed to provide. . . . . ."[/I

    So in any claim I am likely to have to pursue an unknown number of insurers - they didn't tell me who the insurers are, or how many there are - separately from each other and claim percentages from each one. As I was not told this when I called them I am claiming that they have mis-sold me the insurance and I am claiming the whole premium back without deductions.
    I foresee taking them to the Small Claims Court.

    I also foresee calling AIB, where you get none of this nonsense. You get human beings who answer the phone, and sort out problems. That's what we want, not 10% from this insurance company, 30% from that insurance company and 60% from that one, and by the way you the proposer have to take them all to court to get your money.
    Blessed are those who find wisdom, those who gain understanding. Proverbs 3

    #2
    How peculiar! I've never heard of that going on before.

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      #3
      I'm with Admiral, will check my policy.

      I've not heard of it for motor insurance before but it has always been common practice in commercial insurance - for example when insuring a very large building then the risk could be spread across a number of insurance companies so that no one company takes a big hit if a major fire occurs.

      The policyholder wouldn't have to pursue all the separate companies in the event of a claim - one company takes the lead and "re-insures" part of their risk with the others so the policyholder would only deal with the lead company and they would recover their losses from the others.
      Last edited by Caz; 01-07-2016, 12:26.

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        #4
        Surely there's nothing new about the modifications clause. It's been in every policy I've had since I got my first car in 1972.

        I can't really comment on the shared liability bit as I don't think I've ever had a policy that didn't have a single underwriter.
        Geoff

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          #5
          I know about 'modifications' which usually means they usually want to know if you have fitted a jet engine to a Gogomobil, but Admiral say that a modification is anything that is not standard. If they mean any performance enhancements to the car since it first left the showroom, I don't have a problem with that, but I do have a problem with 'not standard'. I fitted a new alternator. That was not how the car left the showroom. It was the attitude of the salesman that rubbed me up the wrong way. I had got a quote from comparethemarketdotcom, I quoted the reference number and he instantly dismissed it and gave me a quote of about £50 more.
          Anyway I'm not going there again, I am the same person who has been buying car and motorbike insurance since 1966 and have never seen terms and conditions like that, and I don't see them at other insurers.
          Blessed are those who find wisdom, those who gain understanding. Proverbs 3

          Comment


            #6
            They will make any excuse not to pay out so it's best to declare anything none standard. If I hadn't declared that I had a tow bar fitted, the Insurance company would not have paid up after my adventure with the trailer when I had a puncture.
            I was able to argue that since I had declared that a tow bar was fitted, it was obvious that I would want to tow something with it. Therefore the trailer WAS covered.
            But what if I hadn't declared the "Modification"?

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by gasgas View Post
              I know about 'modifications' which usually means they usually want to know if you have fitted a jet engine to a Gogomobil, but Admiral say that a modification is anything that is not standard. If they mean any performance enhancements to the car since it first left the showroom, I don't have a problem with that, but I do have a problem with 'not standard'. I fitted a new alternator. That was not how the car left the showroom. It was the attitude of the salesman that rubbed me up the wrong way. I had got a quote from comparethemarketdotcom, I quoted the reference number and he instantly dismissed it and gave me a quote of about £50 more.
              Anyway I'm not going there again, I am the same person who has been buying car and motorbike insurance since 1966 and have never seen terms and conditions like that, and I don't see them at other insurers.
              Hope you got your free Oleg, or at least some free ceenema tickets!
              Cynthia.

              Comment


                #8
                Nope, and Admiral continued by not only ignoring the Comparethemarket reference number and quote, but increasing the price by £70
                Blessed are those who find wisdom, those who gain understanding. Proverbs 3

                Comment

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