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    Chassis welding

    Hello to everyone having welded the chassis of my romahome I now need to weld the cross members .my problem is they where completely rusted and I have had to cut and grind them to the bed of the van .I now need to weld a fabricated section to the underside and I'm not sure if there is a gap between the bed of the van which is metal and the inside of my romahome which is fiberglass any advice would be very much appreciated

    Ian c

    #2
    Plumber's soldering mat?

    Plumbers use a mat made from fireproof and insulating material to solder close to flammable materials, if there is any sort of gap at all behind that you could work it into it might do the job. See http://tinyurl.com/puwrdu4 which is but one example, put "plumbers soldering mat" into Google and you'll get lots of hits.

    Presume you are using MIG welding, if not I'd say that is the preferred option in order to minimise heat input. Short welds followed by local cooling with water would keep things as cool as possible. A soldering mat does not mind getting wet.

    Heard a horror story once about a lad, short of cash and with a banger that had failed MoT due to rusted sills, borrowing oxy-acetelyne kit from work and settling down to braze them into place in his garage. The heat input was so great that (behind his green goggles and failing to see it happening) he set fire to the car, which set fire to the garage, which set fire to the house. There's a moral in there somewhere!

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      #3
      mat

      Thank you Mike never even thought of using anything like that I will be looking into it .hopefully it will do the trick the mat got me thinking and I'm sure a few years ago there used to be a fibrous paste that had the same sort of effect butt the mat sounds a better idea once again thank you
      Ian c

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        #4
        Hi Ian.
        I don't do it so much now (opticians ultimatum) but I used to weld a lot of C15's. There is a ply floor sitting on top of the van floor which is covered in resin on the inside of the van. It burns really well! I used to cut 2 inch holes in the ply floor above the position of the intended welding every foot or so, use a cutter without the centre drill bit fitted and you can replace the ply plug after you're done. To keep the fire down I used an old CO2 fire extinguisher and put a cloth over the outlet gave it a few good squirts and collected the dry ice, I then filled the holes drilled with dry ice and over the floor area between the holes. This had the effect of cooling and kept the oxygen level down as the dry ice gave off CO2 as it warmed to reduce the fire potential. I also had Pam on standby with an air line and damp rags.
        Ant

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          #5
          Thank you Ant I think I will be using this technique to do the welding.Once I've gone threw the fiberglass floor and the plywood I can soak it with water if that's a good idea the people on this site are so helpful I thank you Ant once again.

          Ian c

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            #6
            Originally posted by ant View Post
            Hi Ian.
            I don't do it so much now (opticians ultimatum) but I used to weld a lot of C15's. There is a ply floor sitting on top of the van floor which is covered in resin on the inside of the van. It burns really well! I used to cut 2 inch holes in the ply floor above the position of the intended welding every foot or so, use a cutter without the centre drill bit fitted and you can replace the ply plug after you're done. To keep the fire down I used an old CO2 fire extinguisher and put a cloth over the outlet gave it a few good squirts and collected the dry ice, I then filled the holes drilled with dry ice and over the floor area between the holes. This had the effect of cooling and kept the oxygen level down as the dry ice gave off CO2 as it warmed to reduce the fire potential. I also had Pam on standby with an air line and damp rags.
            Ant
            I recently bought a Barry Stimpson La Meditteranee which I understand was the prerunner of the Romahome Dimension and R30. I think you have just explained to me what the softness is under the carpet between the driver and passenger seats. I know a bit of welding was done under there but I was puzzled by what felt like an area packed with old newspapers or something. Although the van is 2002 it has only done 40,000 miles so I didn't think it could be a floor rot problem. This is my first campervan and probably my last, I'll be 84 later this year.
            Don the Codger

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              #7
              chassis welding

              Hello Don,it's funny that you mention that because i have a Barry Stimpson Tyrol which also has a spongy feel between the seats,but mine isn't to do with welding,perhaps the use of insulation during the conversion is the fault?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by motorhomenewby View Post
                Hello Don,it's funny that you mention that because i have a Barry Stimpson Tyrol which also has a spongy feel between the seats,but mine isn't to do with welding,perhaps the use of insulation during the conversion is the fault?
                How strange, that knocks my welding theory on the head. Mind you it was quite a small weld and well to one side, so I thought it a bit of overkill.

                I see we are both 'newbies' here so perhaps someone with more experience may come along with an explanation. I don't really see it as a fault, in fact it feels quite comfortable under foot.

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                  #9
                  spongy floor

                  Hi Don the only thing I can think of the someone has welded a complete floor in and is distorted which may make it seem a bit spongyb ur if it's solid I wouldn't worry to much
                  Ian c

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by codger View Post
                    How strange, that knocks my welding theory on the head. Mind you it was quite a small weld and well to one side, so I thought it a bit of overkill.

                    I see we are both 'newbies' here so perhaps someone with more experience may come along with an explanation. I don't really see it as a fault, in fact it feels quite comfortable under foot.
                    There is a layer of sound insulation between the cab seats and up under the bulkhead in the cab, the soft feel is almost certainly this material and not part of any repair to the floor.
                    Ant

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by ant View Post
                      There is a layer of sound insulation between the cab seats and up under the bulkhead in the cab, the soft feel is almost certainly this material and not part of any repair to the floor.
                      Ant
                      That's reassuring, thanks Ant.
                      Don

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