Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Interfering with Henrietta

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Interfering with Henrietta

    Just got back from a fabulously successful day fiddling with Henrietta the Hylo.

    As you may have read, I picked up Henrietta last Wednesday and today was the first day I've really had free to tinker. And what a successful day it was!

    Now then, Henrietta was in over all excellent condition, but there were many tinkering and familiarisation jobs to do. As my brother, Steve, has a good size drive, an extensive tool kit and most importantly a splendid girlfriend who makes magnificent tea and cake, Henrietta and I decided to make ourselves at home there for the day.

    We started by sorting out a couple of little internal fittings that were either missing or loose. On a C15, there is a little rail that runs across the entrance to the luton, which I assume is there to stop items in the luton sliding in to the pod as one accelerates away at breakneck speed (as one does in a C15 diesel, obviously). One of the mounting brackets was missing from this attachment. These brackets are simple white plastic wardrobe hanging rail brackets. Unfortunately we were unable to identify a supplier of plastic ones, but a quick furkle in me brothers garage uncovered a splendid pair of chrome items and these were swiftly pop rivetted in to place, as per original fitting. Next, there is a rather natty upholstered pad above the rear door, which I assome is there to stop you cracking your bonce as you exit the pod. This was ill fitting and loose on one side, so a longer screw was duly found and fitted. Job done.

    The next job was going to be much tougher. The pod door at the rear should be a barn door. At some stage in its life, the barn door had been made in to one door, by the addition of a strip of metal down the frame at the join. Also the rear door as a whole didn't seem to fit square to the frame and there was a visible gap at the top of the door between door and frame. Furthermore the door was catching at the bottom right, aluminium on aluminium, as it was shut. Much surgery was needed.

    We started by seperating the two parts of the door and making it back in to a barn door. Easy enough. We then noticed that the door, as a whole, seemed slighly skew whiff in the frame. Or as it turned out, the frame was ever so slightly skew whiff to the pod. I am not sure whether the door frame had been replaced or repaired at some time but it seems just a little bit ****-eyed to the pod. We were trying to make a straight door fit a whoopsie frame, in reality. In the end, we slightly lengthened the holes in the hinges which lifted the top door to square it up to the frame. Gap above top door now gone. We then levelled the bottom door to square it up to the top door which seemed to work, except that it was still catching on the frame at the bottom right corner, as you face the door from the rear. We were a bit bemused until we noticed that where the door and frame had been making contact, probably for some years, the aluminium on the frame had burred over, covering the intended gap between door and frame. A small tack hammer was applied to the frame around the area of the corner until a gap was achieved and the door shut more firmly against the rubber seal. In reality, where the door has been rubbing for some years, I think it has bowed slightly outwards at that corner and it still is slightly clear of the rubber seal at one point. However, the gap is negligable and I am much happier with the fit of the whole door now and I have my barn door back! Very pleased.

    We then turned our attention to the steel retaining catches that hold the Hylo roof down, whilst in motion. These were in essence not physically touching their hooks any more. I think the roof has settled slightly over the years and thus the catches, whilst still going over the hooks, were not applying pressure against them thus were just rattling and squeaking. In the past, someone had attempted a repair by splaying the loop of the catches to shorten the distance to the hooks. Unfortunately, this now required more serious adjustment. What we did, one set at a time, was to remove the hooks, which are quite chunky steel items, lay them on the floor and tap them with a hammer and take a slight bend out of the hook to make it sit nearer the roof and thus make the catches pull down tighter against them. This worked to a certain extent but we had to be careful not to decrease the gap between roof and hook too much that the catch loop wouldn't fit over the hook. With careful trial fitting we got them as tight as we could to the roof and took up any further slackness by slightly splaying the catch loops, until they were a firm fit. A very satisfactory job which has removed all the gnarly squeaky rattles from the rear.

    The next item on the agenda we approached withsome trepidation. When I bought Henrietta, it was mentioned that the grill didn't work. Fair enough, no worries. So we thought we'd try and have a go at fixing it. I went off to place an order for a brew, with me brother's bird and when I came back some minutes later, my brother was proudly standing warming his belly 'gainst the grill. I asked him how he'd got it working. He said he'd turned it on. I collected the tea and we moved down the list.

    Now, in the rear of the pod roof, there is a Britax glass pop up sunroof. It is mentioned in the instruction manual as a Britax sunroof so I am assuming it was factory fitted. I have had problems in the past with water ingress once I've opened a sunroof, so I decided that the sunroof should come out, the rubber seal be properly cleaned, the hinges greased and then the whole lot refitted. As this seemed a grubby job, I left Steve to do this. The Hylo roof was down and it was an amusing sight to look at the rear of Henrietta to see a slightly fat bloke warming his belly against a newly fired up grill while his head stuck out of the sunroof hole whistling I'm in the Mood for Dancing by the Nolan Sisters. As he seemed happy in his work, I moved down a rapidly dwindling list.

    The lovely folk I purchased Henrietta from, had told me that the drivers door retaining strap was broken. This didn't seem to matter as the door didn't go back far enough to do any damage anyway. But as we were on a roll, I had a look anyway. There is a simple metal strap that is supposed to attach through a plate with a hole in connected to the door. It was a simple case that the pin to connect the strap to the plate was missing. I imagine it was originally a pin with a clip, but I replaced it with a bolt, two washers and a locking nut. Easy, job done.

    I returned to see how Steve as doing and he was now cheerfully tanning his bottom against the grill whille refitting and adjusting the sunroof. There were a couple of loose star bolts, which he had tightened. Sunroof now fully functioning. Superb.

    We were down to tinkering and testing now. 240v supply check time. EHU plugged in, quick fiddle with the MCB and 240v happily thrumming through Henrietta. Another job ticked off. One other little iten was a missing hinge pin in the EHU plastic external cover. We swiftly fabricated a pin from a nail, burred over the end and all sorted.

    I looked at the manual, looked at the Zig X7, understood nothing and decided all must be well as the pod 12v works just fine. Required reading for another day, I thnk......

    At this point I asked Steve if he had finished with grill? He declared himself to be both satisfactorily tanned and plenty warm enough, so I turned it off.....

    When I viewed Henrietta, I was informed that the owners had never used the on board water tank or the faucet (tap, to you and me, but it says faucet in the manual.....). So they were unsure whether it worked. So Steve and I decided to chuck a couple of gallon of water in the tank and see what happened. The problem was, we couldn't get the water filler cap off for a bit. It was sort of seized, suckered in to the hole. Eventually, with much wheezing, cursing and application of WD 40, Steve managed to seperate the recalcitrant water filler cap from Henrietta's grasp. I then asked him to show me how he did it, so he put it back in the hole and promptly got the bloody thing stuck again...... When we did eventually encourage it free again, we dabbed a bit of vaseline (from an unnervingly large jar of it that Steve produced from his shed) around the rim and it now open and closes impeccably. We bunged in some water and without much anticipation, to be honest, I turned on the tap. To my utter amazement, the pump buzzed away merrily. Unfortunately, no water appeared at the tap. However, the whale pump on the C15 sits in an open enclosure in the locker behind the passenger seat. I duly uncoupled the hose from the outbound side of the pump, allowing water to run through the pump, thus priming it, I suppose. I retightened the jubilee clip, Steve fired up the tap and a few seconds later, the foulest water this side of my bi-monthly bath, emerged in to the sink. We ran the tap in about ten second intervals until we had drained the tank and tomorrow I shall get some proprietory tank and system cleaner to cleanse the whole affair. Very happy that it is all working though and I do intend to use the onboard tank, as it does seem to work ok.

    We stopped for tea and cake and for Steve to apply some cream to his belly which I do believe he had slightly overcooked.

    The only real other items that required any attention were purely cosmetic, really. Both of the pod sliding windows were very stiff, so, such was Steve's penchant for rubber seals and 70's pop music, that I let him arm himself with some soapy water and silicon spray. He happily set about his task and he gave the window channels a thoroughly good soaking and cleaning and drying, finishing by spraying some silicon spray in to the channels whilst humming various Manfred Mann hits. He's very easy to please. The windows now slide gracefully across their channels.

    And that was about it. We had done everything on my list and more. Henrietta had been a marvel, very easy to work on and there was really nothing wrong with her that didn't need any more than a clean up or a fettle. As I knew when I bought her from the lovely Joy and Stephen.

    We retired for a magnificent roast, cooked by the magnificent Emma and told manly stories about our grappling with mountainous engineering tasks. We drunk tea, flumped on the sofas and eventually said our farewells.

    Thanks bruv, a fondly remembered day, having innocent fun with a new toy in great company with great cake.

    If this is C15 ownership, it is an absolute delight.

    Panda.
    These broken wings are gonna leave me here to stand my ground........

    #2
    I really enjoyed reading about your first adventures with Henrietta. Better than a book at bedtime!
    Mary

    Comment


      #3
      A great read...just make sure you do EVERTHING to keep her secure and outside YOUR house. ! Campers and Motorhomes seem to be very collectable !

      Thought the doors would be similar to those on a de-mountables where the hinges are fixed on the frame side but are adjustable on the door side ( the securing bolts slide up and down in a channel)

      Comment


        #4
        Hi DD. Yep, doors adjust on the hinge side. Absolutely exquisite design and feel, but lacking in the necessary horizontal adjustment, i.e. can go up and down but no 'pivotting' in adjustment. Bruv strategically used thin washers and elongated the hinge holes to adjust the door in the horizontal. Inspired sideways (literally..) thinking. Not bad for a fat bloke who didn't have a pie as a reward, bless him!

        Panda.
        These broken wings are gonna leave me here to stand my ground........

        Comment


          #5
          Dont knock fat blokes....inside we are skinny just like you. We just wear our skin well and fool you all !

          Comment


            #6
            Brilliant, Panda!

            Wish I'd had a brother like your Steve when I was buying older caravans and campervans - there were always things I was going to do to them but never did due to lack of strength, tools and skill. (Although to be fair my brother did do a few wiring 12v jobs for me on a couple of them as he was an electrical engineer)

            Look forward to hearing more of the Tales & Travels of Henrietta!

            Comment


              #7
              Panda, I hope all your posts are going to be this entertaining and informative. And I don't even own a Romahome (anymore)!

              Glad you and Henrietta are bonding so well.
              Anne
              My website and My blog, which includes 'On Location' trip reports.

              Comment


                #8
                Interfering with Henrietta

                Loved reading this. Can I borrow Steve. I can make a good cuppa.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Brilliant post Panda.
                  Graham
                  Did you know you can follow us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter or you can visit us at our Website

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Wonderfully entertaining Panda.

                    I laughed out loud more than once while reading that!
                    Geoff

                    Comment


                      #11
                      What a fascinating read! Well done, both of you. How wonderful to have such useful, practical skills!
                      Carpe diem! :)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Thanks everyone. Steve and I had a wonderful father (long gone now, bless him, but very fondly remembered) who taught us the value of the things we own and indeed to have a go at fixing it before buying a new one. Although neither of us have any engineering qualifications (Steve is a manager on the High Speed trains and I am a Town Crier, amongst other things) we can both turn our hands to most things and most importantly are willing to have a go.

                        I always say that we can do most things adequately and some things quite well. I think that if I would happily have paid a man to do the job I've just done, then I've probably done it ok.

                        Steve is available for sale, hire, or part exchange for a goat.......

                        Panda
                        These broken wings are gonna leave me here to stand my ground........

                        Comment


                          #13
                          open for business?

                          Originally posted by Pandabloke View Post
                          Just got back from a fabulously successful day fiddling with Henrietta the Hylo.

                          As you may have read, I picked up Henrietta last Wednesday and today was the first day I've really had free to tinker. And what a successful day it was!

                          Now then, Henrietta was in over all excellent condition, but there were many tinkering and familiarisation jobs to do. As my brother, Steve, has a good size drive, an extensive tool kit and most importantly a splendid girlfriend who makes magnificent tea and cake, Henrietta and I decided to make ourselves at home there for the day.

                          We started by sorting out a couple of little internal fittings that were either missing or loose. On a C15, there is a little rail that runs across the entrance to the luton, which I assume is there to stop items in the luton sliding in to the pod as one accelerates away at breakneck speed (as one does in a C15 diesel, obviously). One of the mounting brackets was missing from this attachment. These brackets are simple white plastic wardrobe hanging rail brackets. Unfortunately we were unable to identify a supplier of plastic ones, but a quick furkle in me brothers garage uncovered a splendid pair of chrome items and these were swiftly pop rivetted in to place, as per original fitting. Next, there is a rather natty upholstered pad above the rear door, which I assome is there to stop you cracking your bonce as you exit the pod. This was ill fitting and loose on one side, so a longer screw was duly found and fitted. Job done.

                          The next job was going to be much tougher. The pod door at the rear should be a barn door. At some stage in its life, the barn door had been made in to one door, by the addition of a strip of metal down the frame at the join. Also the rear door as a whole didn't seem to fit square to the frame and there was a visible gap at the top of the door between door and frame. Furthermore the door was catching at the bottom right, aluminium on aluminium, as it was shut. Much surgery was needed.

                          We started by seperating the two parts of the door and making it back in to a barn door. Easy enough. We then noticed that the door, as a whole, seemed slighly skew whiff in the frame. Or as it turned out, the frame was ever so slightly skew whiff to the pod. I am not sure whether the door frame had been replaced or repaired at some time but it seems just a little bit **** eyed to the pod. We were trying to make a straight door fit a whoopsie frame, in reality. In the end, we slightly lengthened the holes in the hinges which lifted the top door to square it up to the frame. Gap above top door now gone. We then levelled the bottom door to square it up to the top door which seemed to work, except that it was still catching on the frame at the bottom right corner, as you face the door from the rear. We were a bit bemused until we noticed that where the door and frame had been making contact, probably for some years, the aluminium on the frame had burred over, covering the intended gap between door and frame. A small tack hammer was applied to the frame around the area of the corner until a gap was achieved and the door shut more firmly against the rubber seal. In reality, where the door has been rubbing for some years, I think it has bowed slightly outwards at that corner and it still is slightly clear of the rubber seal at one point. However, the gap is negligable and I am much happier with the fit of the whole door now and I have my barn door back! Very pleased.

                          We then turned our attention to the steel retaining catches that hold the Hylo roof down, whilst in motion. These were in essence not physically touching their hooks any more. I think the roof has settled slightly over the years and thus the catches, whilst still going over the hooks, were not applying pressure against them thus were just rattling and squeaking. In the past, someone had attempted a repair by splaying the loop of the catches to shorten the distance to the hooks. Unfortunately, this now required more serious adjustment. What we did, one set at a time, was to remove the hooks, which are quite chunky steel items, lay them on the floor and tap them with a hammer and take a slight bend out of the hook to make it sit nearer the roof and thus make the catches pull down tighter against them. This worked to a certain extent but we had to be careful not to decrease the gap between roof and hook too much that the catch loop wouldn't fit over the hook. With careful trial fitting we got them as tight as we could to the roof and took up any further slackness by slightly splaying the catch loops, until they were a firm fit. A very satisfactory job which has removed all the gnarly squeaky rattles from the rear.

                          The next item on the agenda we approached withsome trepidation. When I bought Henrietta, it was mentioned that the grill didn't work. Fair enough, no worries. So we thought we'd try and have a go at fixing it. I went off to place an order for a brew, with me brother's bird and when I came back some minutes later, my brother was proudly standing warming his belly 'gainst the grill. I asked him how he'd got it working. He said he'd turned it on. I collected the tea and we moved down the list.

                          Now, in the rear of the pod roof, there is a Britax glass pop up sunroof. It is mentioned in the instruction manual as a Britax sunroof so I am assuming it was factory fitted. I have had problems in the past with water ingress once I've opened a sunroof, so I decided that the sunroof should come out, the rubber seal be properly cleaned, the hinges greased and then the whole lot refitted. As this seemed a grubby job, I left Steve to do this. The Hylo roof was down and it was an amusing sight to look at the rear of Henrietta to see a slightly fat bloke warming his belly against a newly fired up grill while his head stuck out of the sunroof hole whistling I'm in the Mood for Dancing by the Nolan Sisters. As he seemed happy in his work, I moved down a rapidly dwindling list.

                          The lovely folk I purchased Henrietta from, had told me that the drivers door retaining strap was broken. This didn't seem to matter as the door didn't go back far enough to do any damage anyway. But as we were on a roll, I had a look anyway. There is a simple metal strap that is supposed to attach through a plate with a hole in connected to the door. It was a simple case that the pin to connect the strap to the plate was missing. I imagine it was originally a pin with a clip, but I replaced it with a bolt, two washers and a locking nut. Easy, job done.

                          I returned to see how Steve as doing and he was now cheerfully tanning his bottom against the grill whille refitting and adjusting the sunroof. There were a couple of loose star bolts, which he had tightened. Sunroof now fully functioning. Superb.

                          We were down to tinkering and testing now. 240v supply check time. EHU plugged in, quick fiddle with the MCB and 240v happily thrumming through Henrietta. Another job ticked off. One other little iten was a missing hinge pin in the EHU plastic external cover. We swiftly fabricated a pin from a nail, burred over the end and all sorted.

                          I looked at the manual, looked at the Zig X7, understood nothing and decided all must be well as the pod 12v works just fine. Required reading for another day, I thnk......

                          At this point I asked Steve if he had finished with grill? He declared himself to be both satisfactorily tanned and plenty warm enough, so I turned it off.....

                          When I viewed Henrietta, I was informed that the owners had never used the on board water tank or the faucet (tap, to you and me, but it says faucet in the manual.....). So they were unsure whether it worked. So Steve and I decided to chuck a couple of gallon of water in the tank and see what happened. The problem was, we couldn't get the water filler cap off for a bit. It was sort of seized, suckered in to the hole. Eventually, with much wheezing, cursing and application of WD 40, Steve managed to seperate the recalcitrant water filler cap from Henrietta's grasp. I then asked him to show me how he did it, so he put it back in the hole and promptly got the bloody thing stuck again...... When we did eventually encourage it free again, we dabbed a bit of vaseline (from an unnervingly large jar of it that Steve produced from his shed) around the rim and it now open and closes impeccably. We bunged in some water and without much anticipation, to be honest, I turned on the tap. To my utter amazement, the pump buzzed away merrily. Unfortunately, no water appeared at the tap. However, the whale pump on the C15 sits in an open enclosure in the locker behind the passenger seat. I duly uncoupled the hose from the outbound side of the pump, allowing water to run through the pump, thus priming it, I suppose. I retightened the jubilee clip, Steve fired up the tap and a few seconds later, the foulest water this side of my bi-monthly bath, emerged in to the sink. We ran the tap in about ten second intervals until we had drained the tank and tomorrow I shall get some proprietory tank and system cleaner to cleanse the whole affair. Very happy that it is all working though and I do intend to use the onboard tank, as it does seem to work ok.

                          We stopped for tea and cake and for Steve to apply some cream to his belly which I do believe he had slightly overcooked.

                          The only real other items that required any attention were purely cosmetic, really. Both of the pod sliding windows were very stiff, so, such was Steve's penchant for rubber seals and 70's pop music, that I let him arm himself with some soapy water and silicon spray. He happily set about his task and he gave the window channels a thoroughly good soaking and cleaning and drying, finishing by spraying some silicon spray in to the channels whilst humming various Manfred Mann hits. He's very easy to please. The windows now slide gracefully across their channels.

                          And that was about it. We had done everything on my list and more. Henrietta had been a marvel, very easy to work on and there was really nothing wrong with her that didn't need any more than a clean up or a fettle. As I knew when I bought her from the lovely Joy and Stephen.

                          We retired for a magnificent roast, cooked by the magnificent Emma and told manly stories about our grappling with mountainous engineering tasks. We drunk tea, flumped on the sofas and eventually said our farewells.

                          Thanks bruv, a fondly remembered day, having innocent fun with a new toy in great company with great cake.

                          If this is C15 ownership, it is an absolute delight.

                          Panda.

                          Do you all hire yourselves out? If yes, daisy-dog and I will book in! Kent isn't too far!
                          Best wishes
                          Carole & Daisy-dog

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by greensquares1 View Post
                            Do you all hire yourselves out? If yes, daisy-dog and I will book in! Kent isn't too far!
                            Lol, it's one thing poking about on your own camper, but playing with someone else's pride and joy is quite a responsibility!

                            Panda
                            These broken wings are gonna leave me here to stand my ground........

                            Comment


                              #15
                              my pride and joy

                              Originally posted by Pandabloke View Post
                              Lol, it's one thing poking about on your own camper, but playing with someone else's pride and joy is quite a responsibility!

                              Panda
                              Just you keep your hands off my daisy-dog that's all I can say! No lemon sponge for you.
                              Best wishes
                              Carole & Daisy-dog

                              Comment

                              Related Topics

                              Collapse

                              • Pandabloke
                                Henrietta's been framed!
                                by Pandabloke
                                Too nice a day to be indoors so took the opportunity to have another look at Henrietta's pod door.

                                You may remember my brother and I...
                                01-05-2016, 16:51
                              • Lynw28
                                Mending my rear door C15 Romahome
                                by Lynw28
                                I am looking for advice regarding the rear door on my van. Since we've had it (and still not gone out in it), the bottom of the door has always needed...
                                22-08-2014, 15:54
                              • Babs12
                                C15 -water in the well!
                                by Babs12
                                Hello everyone, this is my first post as a C15 romahomer and with it comes a question. I'm getting water in the well at the back door and suspect it is...
                                16-08-2012, 00:44
                              • dave123
                                rain in the back of romahome c15 1992
                                by dave123
                                hi Ant, I have got rain in the back, in between the fridge and the sink. I think it has been coming in from the rubber seal of the back door, saw rain...
                                19-01-2015, 18:10
                              • Guest's Avatar
                                Romahome door leaking
                                by Guest
                                Hi Ant - I have a 1998 Romahome Duo. Water has started coming and up to 3 inches seems to come in via the door somehow although I have not seen how it...
                                27-11-2009, 20:04

                              320x50 mobile only under posts reg users

                              Collapse

                              728x90 google ad under posts desktop only reg users

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X