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    Clockwork Orange

    Today is nice sunny weather, dry and only moderate breeze. My wrist is getting better - I can do more wearing the brace so SWMBO aka Sandra decided it was time we got on with the van. I agreed.
    First stop after walking the dog - car wash to pressure wash the chassis and underside of the pod - especially the bit at the rear, as the first job is to fit new steadies.

    I reversed the van up on the ramps - we are really cooking! For the first time I looked closely at the underside. A few little screw or bolt holes - so I filled them with epoxy putty. Then the first problem an old sink drain poking through the bottom of the van. Gas Drop Out - you think - well maybe in the past but the plywood floor covers it - so it is not. I have fitted a proper Gas Drop Out so ignore it I think. - I'll block the aperture with chopped fibre glass aka bridge-a-gap.

    So I am now lying under the van SWMBO acting as the goffer. I measure up apply some masking tape (easy to mark and better to drill through. - Using the step and screw jack I wedge the steady into positiuon. "Now we are cooking." I said to SWMBO>

    Really? I spoke too soon! My Bosch cordless drill has spent 3 months in a cold garage - CHARGE - what Charge? Not to be deterred I haul out the mains drill and extension - overkill for drilling through 3mm of Fibreglass and 19mm of ply.

    Holes drilled SWMBO gets the tapometer and knocks a bolt through. "This floor is wet!" She announces. Form underneath I tighten the nut. Repeat process with a second bolt. "This bolt head is sinking into the wood." SWMBO says adding sagely "It is wrong the wood is rotten"

    I crawl out from under the van - she is right. Remove bolts, put the stabliser jack backmin the house. Tomorrow we drive 20 miles round trip to get a sheet of 19mm exterior grade ply.

    But back to today - we have now lifted the floor ply. This has allowed me to do a proper job on the plug-hole (if you have not been paying attention - refer b ack to the second paragraph. Once the board was removed the plug-hole fitting was exposed - complete with plug in place - the solution to unwanted draughts!

    Fixing the hole in fibreglass is simple. I have done this before when I owned kit cars. First I wanted a piece of shiny plastic about 3 inches by 3 inches. This I taped to the outside of the pod using a lot of gaffer tape, satisfied it was secure I moved to step 2. Mix up a quantity of chopped fibre and hardener - about a golf ball size amount of chopped fibre and a pea size quantity of hardener.

    I mix on a Storchem Mixing Board - if you have a lot of filling or fibreglassing to do it is great. Basically it is a pad of plastic leaves. Mix on the board then when the unused remains of the mix is going off, peel off a sheet bin it. And once again you have a virgin uncontaminated mixing board.

    Once mixed I swiftly applied a thin layer of chopped fibre into the hole - working it into the edges, Half an hour later it was hard enough to apply a second layer. Tomorrow I will be able to remove the gaffer tape and plastic revealing a patch that will be as smooth and shiny as the surrounding gel coat - no sanding smooth!

    So the Clockwork Orange is progressing slowly.

    Jon

    #2
    "It never rains - but it pours." Yes it is raining so little progress today - we got the ply. Cut 2 pieces to size one for the floor and under where the fridge will go, and a seperate piece to go in the cupboard under the sink - extracting this piece was a pig so to make things easy on instalation I have cut it in half. My part of the job done Sandra is varnishing the bits - well she was until it rained - so stopped until it is dry
    That was not what I meant when I wrote - "It never rains - but it pours." Chuntering along over the hill that forms the spine of Cornwall on the way to get the 18mm ply - we heard that funny wooo--ooo- noise - a bit like an old 3 speed automatic - yes the clutch announced it is on the way out
    Drive carefully and it will last another 100 or more miles.
    Home - the wonders of the internet a new clutch from just under a hundred quid to nearly 300 quids. I order one from what turns out to be a German company so it cost me just under £100 - will the 2 year warranty apply with Brexit ?
    On the plus side she is rear wheel drive - it used to take me less than 2 hours to do a RWD clutch by the side of the road a bit longer now I reckon.
    Thank you for reading this

    If it had been dry I would have taken some pics of the fibreglass repair - but ..... Maybe tomorrow!
    Jon

    Comment


      #3
      Well you have been busy!

      The fibreglass repair sounds excellent. What a great explanation. It will serve for folk in the future who need to effect a similar repair.

      And a new clutch to boot! At least you can fix it. I wonder how much a garage would have charged? A lot more, I'll bet!

      So how has the floor been getting wet? And have you found out where the water was coming in from? I hope you have identified where it was getting in, or your new ply floor will be just as wet in a very short time!

      Do let us know, I'm always interested in how these lovely older vehicles are restored.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by jayjay View Post
        Well you have been busy!

        The fibreglass repair sounds excellent. What a great explanation. It will serve for folk in the future who need to effect a similar repair.

        And a new clutch to boot! At least you can fix it. I wonder how much a garage would have charged? A lot more, I'll bet!

        So how has the floor been getting wet? And have you found out where the water was coming in from? I hope you have identified where it was getting in, or your new ply floor will be just as wet in a very short time!

        Do let us know, I'm always interested in how these lovely older vehicles are restored.
        A few answers required. First thank you for your complimentary comments about the fibreglass repair - I picked it up years ago in my kit car days - so cannot claim to be the innovator.

        The clutch - in Helston we are very lucky there is a DiY garage. Basically for an hourly charge I can hire a professional garage bay complete with hoist and the tools. All I provide is labour, knowledge, and overalls - oh yes and dosh. Reg provides garage bay, tools and free coffee.
        For anyone in West Cornwall here is his details http://www.ubiquemotordiy.com/
        I used to be able to do it lying flat on my back - but now at 69 years old it is getting increasingly difficult.

        Floor - water ingress - chief suspect the sink fitting Gas drop out thingy - now fixed with the aforementioned fibreglass repair - also a couple of smaller screw/ bolt holes - fixed with epoxy putty.

        When I put in the new gas drop-out and bolts for the jacks I will be using copious amounts of sealant. I may try and protect the new gas drop out, to stop spray from the wheels getting in, by using a sort of scoop in reverse (open side facing to the rear).

        Jon

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by kernowjon View Post
          I may try and protect the new gas drop out, to stop spray from the wheels getting in, by using a sort of scoop in reverse (open side facing to the rear).

          Jon
          I had quite forgotten but I used to make these every time I got a new van. Usually from a cocoa tin with a corner sliced of diagonally an attached at an angle with the closed end pointing forward. I got the idea that they were quite important as I had seen them on pro conversions but I couldn't find them to buy anywhere.

          Haven't done one for decades now though as no one else seems to bother anymore. Proper cocoa tins are few and far between too.

          Obviously a good idea regarding water spray and I would also expect them to reduce draughts when traveling. But I wondered if they might have some added safety advantage too. Even heavier than air gas might find it difficult to drop through an unshielded hole with an airflow of 50 mph+ going past.

          Never heard of it being a problem though so have survived without them up to now.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Dapple View Post
            Obviously a good idea regarding water spray and I would also expect them to reduce draughts when traveling. But I wondered if they might have some added safety advantage too. Even heavier than air gas might find it difficult to drop through an unshielded hole with an airflow of 50 mph+ going past.

            Never heard of it being a problem though so have survived without them up to now.
            They wont loose efficiency provided the area of the gas drop out aperture is maintained 75square mm.

            My idea is a Tupperware type box at least 2 inches deep cut out one end. Cut a 1 inch slot in the remaining 2 corners (may need to trim away a bit of rounding. With a heatgun or hairdryer bend the upper inch outwards by 90 degrees so parallel with the floor of the box. Coat these tabs with a good sealant / adhesive Sikoflex or similar and push into place (REMEMBER OPENING TOWARDS THE REAR OF THE VEHICLE maybe using a jack underneath for an hour or so to improve adhesion. Job done - it will look professional.

            Tescos have a range of cheap boxes that look right for the job.

            Jon

            Comment


              #7
              Shielded outlet

              Originally posted by Dapple View Post
              I had quite forgotten but I used to make these every time I got a new van. Usually from a cocoa tin with a corner sliced of diagonally an attached at an angle with the closed end pointing forward. I got the idea that they were quite important as I had seen them on pro conversions but I couldn't find them to buy anywhere.

              Haven't done one for decades now though as no one else seems to bother anymore. Proper cocoa tins are few and far between too.

              Obviously a good idea regarding water spray and I would also expect them to reduce draughts when traveling. But I wondered if they might have some added safety advantage too. Even heavier than air gas might find it difficult to drop through an unshielded hole with an airflow of 50 mph+ going past.

              Never heard of it being a problem though so have survived without them up to now.
              I had problems with my propex outlet on 2 very rainy days fault lights showed the exhaust was blocked but next day if it was dry, no problem. I decided it was water spray getting in the outlet and if I parked drivers side up at all it formed a puddle in the propex exhaust until I drove and it spilled out. So I fitted a backward facing cowl made with a jubilee clip and a bit of aluminium beer can. It reduced an annoying whuther too!

              Comment


                #8
                For a short while this afternoon it stopped raining The new floor - which Sandra has varnished was dry so a quick grab at everything and we got the floor in place - the gas drop-out lined up - everything was cooking a short while later part of the steady had been bolted in place. Then disaster struck we pushed the 8mm bolt through the inboard end - but it was not long enough Then we were cooled off - that's right the heavens opened and we got wet.
                Sandra swiftly got the extension lead, drill and other tools into relative dry. I found a 6mm roofing bolt and effected a temporary fix. Off to Patch and Acre - the new trendy name for Cornwall Farmers - which everyone still calls Cornwall Farmers to get a packet of longer 8mm bolts.

                It is forecast to be dry tomorrow afternoon so maybe we will get the other Jack in place. - watch this space.

                Jon

                Comment


                  #9
                  Photos and update

                  Another few rain free hours. Once again the Clockwork Orange went up on the ramp and we, (Sandra and I) got on with the job. Floor is now down and sealed in so hopefully no damp will get down the sides and attack the structure of the ply Both steady jacks underneath and the Gas Drop-Out has a shield - we shall see if it survives.

                  up on ramps small.jpg Rear view of the van up on ramps see the cardboard I lie on to work underneath.
                  floor sealed small.jpgFloor in the area which will be below the fridge - the pancupboard if SWMBO gets her way - OK pan cupboard.
                  Shield and jacks fitted smal.jpg Gas dropout shield and Steady Jack

                  The jack is holding the shield in place while the adhesive - sealant bonds it into place. The Bolts at the inboard end of the Steady jacks would have posed a problem when we laid a floor covering so I recessed them so the top of the dome head is just about level withthe floor. These 2 bolt heads and the recess was then covered in Sealant. Before inserting the bolts about an inch from the bolt head was coated in sealant before it was pushed through the floor - everything has been about trying to minimise the ingress of damp.

                  Jon

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by kernowjon View Post
                    They wont loose efficiency provided the area of the gas drop out aperture is maintained 75square mm.
                    It wasn't the efficiency with cowls attached I meant jon.

                    I was doubting the efficiency of an unshielded drop out when it had a strong airflow rushing past at 90deg to the outlet.

                    The cowls on the other hand may even offer a degree of extraction.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Dapple View Post
                      It wasn't the efficiency with cowls attached I meant jon.

                      I was doubting the efficiency of an unshielded drop out when it had a strong airflow rushing past at 90deg to the outlet.

                      The cowls on the other hand may even offer a degree of extraction.
                      Hi Dapple - yes I think you are probably correct you could imagine near the exit in the open but shielded area there might be a low pressure area that would create a slight suction.
                      Sandra SWMBO will go mad if things get dragged across her pan cupboard

                      Jon

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by kernowjon View Post
                        Hi Dapple - yes I think you are probably correct you could imagine near the exit in the open but shielded area there might be a low pressure area that would create a slight suction.
                        Sandra SWMBO will go mad if things get dragged across her pan cupboard

                        Jon
                        Fit one under the loo to make up for it.

                        Come to think of it, we might have just invented the ground effect camper.
                        Should cut down the body roll.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          SOD'S LAW - electrics

                          Sod's Law aka Murphy's Law states "If anything can go wrong it will go wrong at the most inconvenient time"

                          Today I was going to do a simple job on the Clockwork Orange - change the old light cluster for LED lights.
                          First problem someone wired the pod using all black wires - no colour code. Using the meter I can live with that - identified the earth wire and marked it as I removed each tail light unit.
                          Better say the pod is not connected via a Trailer socket and plug - no the wires to Pick-up tail lights have been cut and joined to said black wires.

                          Flying on with the righthand side all working - except fog light to be done tomorrow afternoon (?)

                          Left lights wire the tail light, brake light. Could I get the indicator to work - NO - SOD's LAW has kicked in.

                          I am now under Clockwork Orange looking at the wiring - find the indicator wire so ,maybe the fault is where the pick-up loom is joined to black pod wires. Cut the wiring remove the join strip back the insulation to rejoin the wires. The wire is corroded and black. Memories all flood back. The Daihatsu is made in Italy! I remember my 1000cc Moto Guzzi Convert (converted from automatic to a manual box) a fantstic bike but always electrical faults. The Italians use really poor conductors - the Guzzi was great after I rewired and put in Honda switch gear. What has this to do with the Clockwork Orange?

                          Wednesday (tomorrow if the weather clears) I shall rewire the back end from the cab back using trailer wire and color code and rewire the pod. Eventually everything will be spot-on - I hope I can be an optomist
                          Jon

                          Comment


                            #14
                            It was a day off yesterday - blowing a hooley and my bones will not take the cold ground. I went to our local motor factors some crimp butt connectors and a 6m trailer extension cable.

                            Today was a nice day. So wire in the tail lights. I cut into the extension leaving about 12 inches 300mm attached to the socket. I removed the non color coded black wires from the light cluster - can ayone fathom the logic of using non color coded wires - even finance over using trailer cable can only be marginal
                            Black wires....jpg

                            The wire from the plug I pushed through the existing hole on the right hand side of the pod and wired onto the back of the rh light cluster - from this another length of cable runs along the floor close to the door to the left cluster - behind the right cluster is like spaghetti junction - it all makes sense to me - the gold colored object is the load to make the LED indicators flash at the correct rate.

                            spag junc.JPG

                            Underneath I cut into the rear loom (someone else had already cut away the wires from the pick-up lights) and attached the wires from the Trailer Socket - the Socket I attached to a convenient piece on the pick-up chassis (mounting for the rear foglight), and plugged in the pod plug. Success everything is working - except for the fog lights a problem to be solved - not working when I started.

                            Plug and socket.jpg

                            It looks pretty good - a quick word about the number plate - relocated to a higher position - the number plate is lit by the LED bolts which secure the plate - very clever I think!
                            LED lights fitted.JPGNo Plate lights.JPG

                            Finally if anyone has a use for the original Pod light units - one has a slightly damaged lens that could be ficxed with araldite or whatever contact me - they are free you pay postage.

                            Jon

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Battery Box

                              What a way to spend Good Friday, but we must get on so today was the day to mount the battery box onto Clockwork Orange's chassis. If anyone has followed the conversation on Donk's Dad's thread http://www.smallmotorhome.co.uk/foru...-battery-boxes
                              you will know I do not like the idea of gassing batteries in the pod.
                              A young man who builds and races Formula 2 stock cars fabricated and welded me a battery boix to my specs - to fit the 110 amp hour Xplorer battery.

                              Battery Box.jpg

                              As per my specs the box has a row of 10mm holes. The first task was to drill corresponding holes into the chassis - If I had measured and drilled the holes would have been in the wrong place. What I did, after first clearing the brake pipes from the chassis member, was to put the battery box in place held by the jack. I drilled the first hole, pushed through a bolt and drilled the second hole. Once these holes were drilled - drilling the other 2 was simple.

                              box bolted up.jpg

                              In this picture the battery is securely in place - as always I have bolted it into a bed of sealant - I used large "penny washers" to spread the load. I then cut a piece of 10mm plywood to line the back of the box so the battery will not foul on the bolt heads.

                              Battery installed.jpg

                              I think the whole thing is looking quite good - The task for Monday will be install the Solar Panel and wire in the charging system. Hopefully by the end of next week the elactrics and the water system will be completed.

                              Thank you for reading this - I hope it helps someone else.
                              Jon

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