Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How viable is rust?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    How viable is rust?

    Hi,

    I am rebuilding a 1959 Land Rover onto a new galvanised chassis. My philosophy is that if the chassis is sound, everything else is a nut and bolt job.

    My daily hack is a R-reg Peugeot 306 TD estate, which I regret to say, I can only critise for being blue and French. In two years it has done everything it says on the tin. I decided before it's last MOT, that if it failed, I would weigh it in. It passed, with no advisories, and complimented by the tester ... never welded, as far as he could see. Dilema! Better the devil I know ... so I spent £600 on a cambelt, water pump. service etc. If the belt broke, it would be scrap, and I would have to buy another unkown clunker, so £600 seemed a sensible spend.

    Right, down to the nitty gritty. This car might be worth £500. To me it's worth £10 per week, even if it fails the next MOT. But if I bought a similar vehicle (say a Citroen C15) converted into a camper, I would have to pay a lot more than £500, and a lot, lot, more if I wanted something more modern. I would be paying for the living quarters, not the base vehicle. But it's the base vehicle that is going to have to pass/fail an MOT, which is what will decide the value of my camper ... on an annual basis. A vehicle costing, say, £10,000 today, could be worth only £100 this time next year. Oh, OK, if you want to be pedantic ... worth £100 in five years time. I supposer losing £40 per week isn't too bad if you say it quickly.

    How do other people resolve this dilema?

    I have pondered whether buying a Bedford CA Dormobile would make more sense. They seem to be approaching £10,000 now, and rising. Seperate chassis, simple mechanicals. As they are appreciating, it might be viable to spend money doing repairs as and when necessary.

    602

    #2
    A good campervan costing £10K today will still be worth at least £1K in 5 years time even if it fails it's MOT then - and probably a lot more unless it hasn't been looked after. A car will have depreciated at the same rate at least.

    Comment


      #3
      Well.......... If you think you could enjoy driving a Bedford CA, then fine.
      I would suspect though that sourceing parts to rebuild one would be extremely expensive and difficult. And the result would hardly be a "King of the road" in modern traffic.
      JimW.
      Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

      Comment


        #4
        What about a VW T4 ? Overpriced when new but an older one would still be nice to drive and VWs usually have loads of underseal on, everything else is replaceable.

        Comment


          #5
          If your 306 passed with no advisories and does the job then i would stick with it to be honest, especially having just shelled out £600 on a cambelt, might as well get some value out of it. 306's with the 1.9TD engine are one of the most economical and durable "bangernomics" motors you can buy. We had an R reg 306 with the same engine and it was a great car, probably should have kept it with hindsight. The estate versions are more prone to rust than the hatches though, you have to keep an eye on the seatbelt anchor points.

          If you want a camper though, they seem in the main to be a pretty wise investment, Romahomes in particular seem to hold their value really well.
          Better a rainy day on the hill than a sunny day in the office!

          Comment


            #6
            I've always, due to the demands of my business, done fairly big mileages on my vehicles, and needed them to be reliable and functioning safely ! Consequently, I've usually maintained loyalty to a model/range.
            For example, I used Citroens for 12/15 years, and Volvos for the last 25 years, all "pre=owned" (!) mainly because they were what was needed for work - big carry capacity, comfortable, and reasonably speedy on long hauls here and abroad.
            (Also, all had to be good towing vehicles at speed.)

            The thing is, I never saw the point of changing them until it was a definite "withdraw oxygen" case, or a daft move economically - which,being primarily a money earner, was the sensible proviso !

            Doing big mileages (no vehicle I used ever did less than 230,000 miles in a pretty short length of time) and the fact that I used the vehicles for so long because they were ideally suited for my needs, meant that if I did have to replace a major part, or had a big service regularly, a) it was still on the road and doing the job, and, b) I knew what had been done to, or replaced on it, which I wouldn't if I swapped more often. And I've never been much of a "must have the latest " nerd, frankly .......
            .
            Which also meant that, barring the always ever-present possibility with any motor of a major blow-up etc...,
            that they were reliable, earned their keep, and I knew roughly what might be needed next. And a good relationship with a garage/mechanic you trust is a big part of my approach. So, I've always had a rough expectation of when that phone call might come, saying the patient is past saving !

            My last Volvo did 310k, and I was sad to see it go, but the replacement is even more comfortable, has all the goodies I could want, and is a lot quicker.... so I've managed to get over it !
            But I have booked the next service already ........
            Last edited by rugmike; 18-06-2015, 09:38.

            Comment


              #7
              Rust has persuaded me to dispose of my old Rover. Not that it is falling to bits or is unreliable. But it is starting to look tatty. though prompt attention, touch up wise, will keep it going for years yet.
              Fully road worthy and with with nearly six months MOT I have put it on ebay for a £50 start - no reserve.
              Can't be a bad buy. The battery cost over half of that!
              But I have had seven almost maintenance cost free years out of it. I would hardly be losing if I gave it away. I think it only cost me £500 to start with.
              Less than a £1.50 a week (ignoring insurance etc.) cannot be bad economics!

              JimW.
              Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

              Comment


                #8
                I knew there was a reason I loved my Nissan's so much - they have a cam CHAIN, not a cambelt ... and never need replacing!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by jayjay View Post
                  I knew there was a reason I loved my Nissan's so much - they have a cam CHAIN, not a cambelt ... and never need replacing!
                  Chain driven cams can break, its just that with most cars the body rots off first......
                  Better a rainy day on the hill than a sunny day in the office!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Rob B View Post
                    Chain driven cams can break, its just that with most cars the body rots off first......
                    I have to second Rob on that.
                    I did have a chain break many years ago. Fortunately valves and pistons could rarely touch in those days.
                    But the scrunched up chain at the bottom of the remains of the timing cover, wrapped around the damaged crankshaft nose cost plenty to repair.
                    However. That likelihood is remote compared with the failure of unchanged cam-belts so I prefer chains.
                    JimW.
                    Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Hi,

                      Thanks for replies and thoughts.

                      Oops! I meant to post this in the camper columns. It seems my Senior Moments are maturing by the day.

                      I can live with the performance of a Bedford CA ... I have owned early Land Rovers almost continously since 1972. But during the same time had a car that "red-lined" at circa 200mph, and SWMBO had a car that could indicate 70 in second and 100 in third ... we never found out what it could do in fourth or fifth.
                      However, we have reached the stage in life where appearing before the "Beaks" is likely to be rewarded with a DTTP (Disqualified Till Test Pass), even for minor offences. That is their way of checking you are not senile. Passing such a test would give us a Cat.B licence, not the Cat.B+E that we currently hold. We both lost our Cat.C and D entitlement when we turned 70. SWMBO's final fling was her 70th birthday present ... three laps round Silverstone in each of a Ferrari and an Aston Martin. She said she found the AM to be "cumbersome".

                      So nowadays, we just want something that will hold it's own in traffic. All the fun is in acceleration, with the occasional "pose". Yes, I will be reluctant (but not sad) to see the Peugeot depart. I'd like to keep it, but overheads (tax, insurance, MOT) come to over £500 per year. SWMBO has a 2012 Hyundai I10, which has negligible tax, similar insurance, same MOT, but crazily it's costing her 15p per mile in routine servicing. She is thinking about replacing it with a bigger Hyundai (new). My Land Rover is exempt VED, exempt MOT, and costs about £80 per year to insure ... all negligible, but heavy on petrol, but it won't be doing a lot of miles. It's a toy that can be used as a tool when required.

                      We can afford to run SWMBO's Pleb-mobile, and my Landy, hands in pocket and whistling. We can afford to buy and run a camper too, but I don't relish depreciation equal to about half my state pension. My feelings are that we should look for a low-buck camper ... C15, Rascal, VW ... and be prepared to write it off (financially) over two or three years, with any longer being a bonus.

                      But lack of knowledge makes me wonder about rust on a C15.

                      Lack of knowledge makes me wonder about leg-room in Rascal and similar. I had a Daihatsu Hijet pick-up. found it so cramped it hurt. Are campers based on similar micro-vans also as cramped? Query rust.

                      I believe the VW T4 is subject the LEZ, but the T2 is below the LEZ threshold. Is that correct? I have no plans to drive into London, though my sister lives in Dulwich. But I would not be surprised to find LEZ extending and/or appearing elsewhere. I am tending towards petrol anyway ... over low milage the difference in cost is negligible. I assume there are plenty of experts in dealing with rusty VWs.

                      The other solution is a small caravan, but I'm getting too old to man-handle things that are reluctant to move. I think a Romini would be too small (and more than I would want to pay for a trailer) Freedom would be accetable and cheap, provided the "Bordello Red" upholstery wasn't sagging too much. Don't want a trailer tent, getting too old. Folding caravan? I know nothing about them. What else is there? I fancied that old Eriba on Ebay, been parked in France for many years.

                      More thoughts please.

                      602

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Hi,

                        That Eriba in France ... Ebay Reference - 221797691538

                        I'd love it, but not convenient to buy it this week ... house sale is delayed by nasty survey, buyer not withdrawn though. Possible haggle after structural survey.

                        602

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Rob B View Post
                          Chain driven cams can break, its just that with most cars the body rots off first......
                          You're right there! Never changed the cam chain, but have to have the sills welded nearly every year.. and had to have the wheel arches welded as well last year.... at 93K though, I'm not complaining...

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Lack of knowledge makes me wonder about leg-room in Rascal and similar. I had a Daihatsu Hijet pick-up. found it so cramped it hurt. Are campers based on similar micro-vans also as cramped? Query rust.
                            I can't speak for any one else's demountable, but my Rascal was incredibly cramped. Two people taller than me (both 6ft) eventually had to go and sit in the back, they were in pain cramped up in the passenger seat.

                            Micro vans are not the same thing at all. They don't have what is, essentially, separate habitation on top of a flat bed van.

                            The C15s have proper car seats, as do most of the other small campervans, and leg room as in a car.

                            There are plenty of Eribas in the UK, you don't need to go abroad to buy one!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              How about a demountable on the back of a landrover? Something like this.

                              http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Motorhome-...item33a433e65c

                              or this

                              http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/mazda-b250...item2ee2d1b563

                              Julie
                              Last edited by JazziJ; 19-06-2015, 10:10.

                              Comment

                              Related Topics

                              Collapse

                              320x50 mobile only under posts reg users

                              Collapse

                              728x90 google ad under posts desktop only reg users

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X