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How viable is rust?

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  • w3526602
    replied
    Hmmm.

    Can only post one picture at a time.

    602

    2015 07 10. GALVANISED PARTS.02.jpg

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  • w3526602
    replied
    Hi,

    Seeing as I started this discussion about rust, I try to finish it on the same subject.

    Here are a couple of photos of my 1959 Land Rover project, whixch is now destined to become a camper.

    If rust can cause problems, I've had it galvanised. The new chassis came already galvanised.

    6022015 07 10. GALVANISED PARTS.01.jpg

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  • 3Windo
    replied
    Originally posted by w3526602 View Post
    Hi Twolitre,

    See picture of my 1957 Land Rover pulling in excess of 2500kg. Boat was 9 metres, but had to be set back on the trailer to get the balance right, so was sticking out about 1.5 metres ... about 35ft from towball.

    Steering became vague at much over 50mph. so I settled for cruising at 45mph. Day 1 was from Billing Aquadrome to Pontardawe in the Swansea Valley, using only A-roads. Everyone gave me bags of room, including HGVs and one police car ... until I got into the back streets near home. A bimbo in an Escort argued the toss about who had priority on her side of a corner. Day two took us to the Taunton Canal, using M4 and a short bit of the M5, no incidents, apart from lining up with the pumps at a country garage.

    But to come On Topic. The trailer had four wheels, so driving over "cross hatching" on the road was shaking the back end of the Land Rover up and down. Highways Authority paint is too thick. :-)

    Was I legal? I think so, but just because I did it ....

    602
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]8839[/ATTACH]
    I love that last line, been there many times!!!.

    Frank

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  • w3526602
    replied
    Hi Twolitre,

    See picture of my 1957 Land Rover pulling in excess of 2500kg. Boat was 9 metres, but had to be set back on the trailer to get the balance right, so was sticking out about 1.5 metres ... about 35ft from towball.

    Steering became vague at much over 50mph. so I settled for cruising at 45mph. Day 1 was from Billing Aquadrome to Pontardawe in the Swansea Valley, using only A-roads. Everyone gave me bags of room, including HGVs and one police car ... until I got into the back streets near home. A bimbo in an Escort argued the toss about who had priority on her side of a corner. Day two took us to the Taunton Canal, using M4 and a short bit of the M5, no incidents, apart from lining up with the pumps at a country garage.

    But to come On Topic. The trailer had four wheels, so driving over "cross hatching" on the road was shaking the back end of the Land Rover up and down. Highways Authority paint is too thick. :-)

    Was I legal? I think so, but just because I did it ....

    602
    LAND ROVER BITZA. FEU254. T4.JPG

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  • w3526602
    replied
    Hi Twolitre,

    Agreed! That photo was taken on journey home after purchase (New). I dropped the lowball when I got home.

    Somebody may be interested ... Freedom caravans are manufactured to be 850kg, but are down rated for the UK. I think there can be very few occasions when that would be necessary.

    We asked for our new van to be plated to 850kg, which meant waiting for a new plate from Poland,or wherever. FOC upgrade, which meant we could bring an extra 100kg of booze back from France.

    Peter, I don't know Gordon and Vena, but I'll ask on the S2C forum.

    602

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  • Twolitre
    replied
    Originally posted by w3526602 View Post
    Hi,

    Update. We are now looking at fitting a home-spun coach-built body on the back of my Land Rover. This will entail chopping the existing truck-cab down into a chassis cab, before starting to rebuild.

    In the meantime, here is a picture from a previous existance.

    602

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]8837[/ATTACH]
    I imagine that with the comparative sizes of tug and trailer in the photo' it does not matter much. But it is generally recommended that caravans should never be towed with a nose-up attitude for stability.
    With a lighter tug or larger caravan it could be significant?
    JimW.

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  • peterholden
    replied
    Good morning 602

    You know that you really want another land rover, either a dormabile or a carawagon although a Lomas ambulance would make a good camper.

    We had our C15 romahome for 3 years and spent very little on it but got more for it as a trade in than we had paid to buy it. That allowed us to buy our Berlingo romahome new in 2007 at a discount anyway as the dealer had it in stock and it was fitted with the "undesirable" 1.9 engine, but this suited us as we hope to keep it for 20 years, we have had it eight so far.

    If you are building your own you mightbe interested in Gordon and Venas camper (sorry I dont know their surname) but they are members of the series 2 club and they live in the lake district.

    Peter

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  • w3526602
    replied
    Hi,

    Update. We are now looking at fitting a home-spun coach-built body on the back of my Land Rover. This will entail chopping the existing truck-cab down into a chassis cab, before starting to rebuild.

    In the meantime, here is a picture from a previous existance.

    602

    MAZDA and FREEDOM MICROLITE 01.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • w3526602
    replied
    Hi,

    As the clutch friction plate wears, the release fingers (or whatever) poke further out of the pressure cover. leading to the "free play" being taken up. The pedal will get higher, until there isn't any free play left ... the clutch is on the point of disengaging before the pedal is pressed. It will start to slip. The quiuick fix is to adjust the cable to regain some free play.

    Most of my cars, when I was a teenager, had been adjusted so many times that there was no clutch linmg left, and the rivets had gouged grooves in the flywheel. Do they still use rivets.

    Hydraulic clutches will usually self adjust, until the slave piston bottoms-out, provided there is not a return spring on the release lever.

    602

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  • MYKE
    replied
    What is the correct adjustment for the clutch?

    The only adjustment I have found is on the cable at the gearbox end. My other Talbot had a brand new clutch driven plate (Price £140 from Fiat main dealers and not available anywhere else). and my currant van feels exactly the same, so I'm assuming (hoping) there's plenty of meat left on it.

    There seems to be a lot of free play at the pedal, but if I take up any slack, the clutch will not disengage enough to select the gears. I have been thinking of fitting some sort of restrictor to prevent the pedal coming so far up.

    Or will the pedal come down on its own as the clutch plate wears away?

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  • paul
    replied
    Originally posted by MYKE View Post
    I had forgotten about the gear change. You have to lift your knee up shoulder high to find the clutch pedal, which then has to be pushed down to the floor in order to select a gear. But you soon get used to it.
    I had this issue on a Fiat Ducato which I bought. When I looked at the vehicle I thought that the clutch pedal was impossibly high but the owner just said that that's the way they are. I did some research which confirmed my suspicions that the clutch pedal was incorrectly fitted.

    After buying the vehicle I fitted the pedal correctly and all was well. The high clutch pedal on these vehicles seems to be a well-propogated myth but it just isn't true.

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  • w3526602
    replied
    Hi Myke,

    Herewith a piccy of my Talbot camper, pity it wasn't the side with the slam door. It's parked outdide our hovel in France which cost us £10,000, but included the barn you can just see in the background. I should have more pics, but I don't know where they are.

    I've also posted a picture of my Hijet micro pick-up that hurt my legs. But YIKES ... it could accelerate.

    602

    CAMPER AT LED.JPG
    DAIHATSU HIJET R407NOU NSF 1.jpg

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  • MYKE
    replied
    It' a standard five speed box with the lever spring loaded to centre on 2nd/4th so you have to push left against the spring to select 1st and 2nd.

    5th and reverse are spring loaded to the right. The linkage has a lot of joints in it and they all wear over time, so it's always a bit sloppy, but once you get used to it, you don't notice .

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  • w3526602
    replied
    Hi,

    My memory of both gear changes was to pull back out of First, then LEFT and back into Second, then forward, RIGHT and forward into Third ..... all done slowly.

    6022

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  • MYKE
    replied
    I had forgotten about the gear change. You have to lift your knee up shoulder high to find the clutch pedal, which then has to be pushed down to the floor in order to select a gear. But you soon get used to it. Like I said, I'd forgotten all about it.

    I've had both a coach built, and a high top and the high top is best for me. It has everything the coach built has, but it's smaller on the outside so easier to park.

    These vans have a powder coated chassis which keeps rust at bay, although mine has just had to have the sill welded for the MOT and the paint makes it difficult to weld to.

    Being built on a chassis, the sills are not structural, but he got me on being too close to a spring mounting. Had I known before the MOT I would have ripped the sill off, and built a locker in its place to keep the hook up cable etc. in.

    Now I've done too good a job of the welding and it would make it too big a job to undo.

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