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    #31
    Originally posted by The Sitter View Post
    I remember using dried food when we first started camping, Smash, Vesta and dried milk powder. I was never much good at mixing up Smash always got dried bits left in it, Vesta wasn't my favourite and most of the dried milk powder, I remember Marvel, were o.k in coffee but horrible in tea. The best one we ever found was Five Pints and that had fat added to it so tasted more like fresh mik. I used to buy Look What we've found when they sold it in my local Sainsbury but of course they've stopped doing it now, The meatballs were good as was the chili and bolognese. As Caz says, with everyone getting fridges and freezers dried food has declined. The same can be said of tinned food, we used to be able to get Heinz tinned beefburgers and hamburgersto take camping but I haven't seen them for years. I do remember dried egg powder that my mum used to get after the war when eggs were still in short supply and on ration, I'm told it was a favourite of my brother and I and that we used to pinch it out the tin when my mum wasn't looking but I can't remember what it tasted like.

    Janet
    I used to hate that tinned Marvel and I did like that stuff in the plastic bottle with an orange lid but the boss said she stopped buying it because it was very expensive. We now have in our cupboard for emergencies a tub of Asda skimmed milk powder and it doesn't taste half bad in a cup of tea and the best thing about it, is it dissolves, you don't have to chase big lumps around the surface with a spoon lol

    I have plenty dehydrated egg in my supplies and made many omelettes with it, chucking in dehydrated mushrooms, tomatoes, cheese even chicken.

    On one occasion in a training survival situation, I had only dried egg powder in my pack and I shouldn't have even had that but I smuggled it into my Bergan, 56hrs later and starving to death and after nothing but a small bar of chocolate also smuggled into my pack. Daylight was fading and I decided to find a place to camp for the night and get a fire going, Got out my mess tin and added some egg powder to a small amount of water, it didn't look appetising even in it's powder form, it looked rather plain but looking around me I could see things I could add to my omelette, so I went out gathering, came back and chopped everything up and chucked it into my omelette and believe after around 60hrs of eating very little that was the best dandelion and clover omelette I've ever tasted, to be honest I don't know it it was an omelette or scrambled egg but who cared it was edible, followed by dandelion roots cleaned and chewed. No wonder I never put on any weight
    "Take nothing but pictures. Leave nothing but footprints. Kill nothing but time"

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      #32
      I always have a stock of Tesco dried milk as I add it to my breadmaking.

      I also use it upstairs in the bedroom for morning tea for John and he doesn't mind it

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        #33
        Originally posted by Graham View Post
        They are on sale here in tablet form Ian http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/lifes...Q&gclsrc=aw.ds
        As I said, very interesting, the attached patent explains how the tablet constituents react in the presence of water to produce Chlorine Dioxide.The reaction uses some nasty items. I would be wary of it, all my scientific experience says here be dragons.

        http://www.google.co.uk/patents/US7666384
        Young men sow wild oats.Old men grow sage.

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          #34
          There is a secret to using dried milk powder to whiten hot drinks, as I'm sure you all know. Mix the powder with a little cold water first and then add the mixture to tea or coffee, as you would ordinary milk. It doesn't produce lumps that way. Simples!

          Panda
          These broken wings are gonna leave me here to stand my ground........

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            #35
            Originally posted by Pandabloke View Post
            This's quite interesting because I'm considering a big walk this year, perhaps a through hike of the South Downs Way.

            I'm not sure about a home dehydrated stuff, but I looked at dehydrated meals available at camping stores and they are jolly expensive! At least £4.00 per meal and per course.....

            However with a bit of research and lateral thinking I realised that a lot of 'pot' meals, like pasta, quinoa, noodles etc can be bought very easily, tipped out of the plastic pot and put in a resealable food bag. These are tastier than normal 3 minute noodle packs and such like and pack down for storage much better. Also there is a good bolognese meaty dehydrated pack that rehydrates just like mince, not specifically for camping, but it does work well. Also smash, as you say and instant porridge that comes in a pot can be bagged up and it is designed just for hot water, no milk.

            Uncle Ben does a couple of really filling risottos and of course tasty rices and a small boil in the bag plain rice that come in a box of ten. Also there is a company that does sachets of meat, called 'Look What We Found' which do not require refrigeration. Meatballs and chilli spring to mind and available at Poundland!

            Ooh, I forgot to mention milk powder!

            Not a huge variety of foods, but more than adequate for a few days walking or in the van and much, much cheaper than shop bought rehydrateables. And also really useful if you don't have a fridge in the van.

            All this stuff I sought out so it could be cooked simply on the trail on a Trangia.

            Hope this hasn't come too far off the original topic!

            Panda

            Hi all,

            Add to this list Pasta 'n' Sauces which an be made only with water and of course that wonderful smoked sausage that comes in a foil sachet and can be wrapped up again and kept for a couple of days with deteriorating. Great, sliced up with pasta or rice.

            Panda
            These broken wings are gonna leave me here to stand my ground........

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              #36
              Dehydrated food

              We walk some long distance trails. once I set off with 18 days food from hospit d Andorra, carrying food for my wife too. Dehydrated food is a must. We lost weight even so as the shop nine days off no longer existed and we had to stretch what was left for another day.
              My favourite from Asda a sachet of tuna or other fish with flavouring and 2 packets of asda dried potato with roast onion, add olive oil from a 100mm bottle if available. 3 sachets of Ainsley herriot flavoured cous cous with cheese and oil added. That for 2. Olive oil is about the most calorific food per gram you can get so adding it to something else helps minimise weight carried.
              They at least make a change from pot noodle and pasta. All are much cheaper than specialist camping food. We nearly always carry ainsley herriot dried soup for first course too.

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                #37
                I only found out last week that Beanfeast, which is a staple for us even when not camping, appears to be discontinued.

                Any suggestions for a replacement?

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                  #38
                  If you are that worried about things in the water and on the land maybe you should stick to pub meals, beer is very safe ! When I walked the Pennine Way (twice) I used Vesta dried curries, they don't taste anything like a real curry but with some dried peas they are a good meal. Oh and I drank stream water with no ill effects. Baaa !
                  Young men sow wild oats.Old men grow sage.

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                    #39
                    When Vesta first came out in the 1960's I was camping somewhere, went into a shop and looked at a packet of Vesta curry. It said 'just add water' or something like that so I bought some. I was disgusted and amazed that the implication that you only need water was totally untrue. You also needed a vessel to hold the water in, and some heat to boil it. We didn't have that so couldn't eat the Vesta. That was the money gone for that day's meal. I don't think I have bought any since then.
                    I always was one for being precise and telling the whole truth. It often annoys me when instructions don't include everything you need to do, and the latest example is the Nissan Leaf electric car I bought. The salesman did not tell me that you must not recharge it if the battery is more than 80% charged. If you do, you invalidate the warranty. The result is that whereas the battery is supposed to be guaranteed for five years, the current owner of the under-three year old car is expected to pay £5000 for a new battery because I recharged it when it was over 80%. That in turn means that if you have a 100 mile range on a full battery, and you want to do a 100mile journey, if your battery is 80% charged, you cannot recharge it so your range is in fact 80 miles. So to add to the cliff drop depreciation of electric cars, you have to add £2000 a year for battery costs. No thanks, not again. And even if I do buy a new car, it certainly won't be a Nissan.
                    Necessarium esse superfluum Latin

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                      #40
                      In the dim and distant past (the early 1960s) I spent a lot of time on Dartmoor - supposedly to do with my Duke of Edinburgh Award expeditions, really because it was an acceptable compromise between a "school phobic" and the school.
                      Porridge, Cadburys Smash and Vesta Curries were my diet. They were light to carry - yes Jeff I had a Bergen! When I went to Outward Bound School at just short of 15 before the expedition they weighed our packs to check we were all carrying 70 pounds (about 32Kg).

                      I digress as Dapple reports often in the morning after breaking camp we would find a dead sheep in the stream a few hundred yards upstream from where we had drawn water for supper and breakfast. We always believed boiling had killed all possible nasties.

                      Yes in the van somewhere there are some dehydrated soups, some Smash (or Lidels version of), and of course Porridge my breakfast favourite. Why not so much dehydrated - weight we would need to carry more water - I no longer have such faith in boiled water

                      Jon
                      Amor omnia vincit et nos cedamus amori

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                        #41
                        It always amazes me that Tesco (and others) can sell a 2 litre bottle of water for 17p. How is it possible to bottle water, put it on a truck, send it to a depot, transfer it through the warehouse, on to another truck, take it to the shop, put it on the shelf and process it through the till for 17p? And it's the same price on the Isle of Man where they have to add the cost of the ferry journey.
                        Then of course there are people, allegedly, who will pay over £1 for a 300cc bottle of water. Eh? What are they thinking? Clearly not that they had to earn £1.40 before tax to have a drink that they could have got free of charge from the Gents in that very shop. Or ladies' of course, depending on your preference.
                        Even more amazing is that people will go into Certain Coffee Shops (OK, there isn't just one at the game) and pay the price of a main meal for a 10p drink!
                        Necessarium esse superfluum Latin

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                          #42
                          Originally posted by gasgas View Post
                          It always amazes me that Tesco (and others) can sell a 2 litre bottle of water for 17p. How is it possible to bottle water, put it on a truck, send it to a depot, transfer it through the warehouse, on to another truck, take it to the shop, put it on the shelf and process it through the till for 17p? And it's the same price on the Isle of Man where they have to add the cost of the ferry journey.
                          Then of course there are people, allegedly, who will pay over £1 for a 300cc bottle of water. Eh? What are they thinking? Clearly not that they had to earn £1.40 before tax to have a drink that they could have got free of charge from the Gents in that very shop. Or ladies' of course, depending on your preference.
                          Even more amazing is that people will go into Certain Coffee Shops (OK, there isn't just one at the game) and pay the price of a main meal for a 10p drink!
                          Guilty as charged on all three!

                          But not very often, and never in CostaNeroBucks, just local independents.
                          Geoff

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                            #43
                            Back to the topic, in our town there is an excellent ex- military shop that sells dehydrated compo rations. I did look at them but thought they were a bit expensive. My camper sleeping bag recently broke its zip, which I think is the usual cause of the demise of sleeping bags, and outdoor coats. I've just bought a lovely sleeping bag from the ex-military shop, far far better made than the domestic ones you get from caravan shops. It has a big fat zip up the middle, as opposed to the side. This zip has a velcro-fastened flap over it in case you are camped on the side of a mountain with a force ten gale blowing. I guess the zip position means that when you roll over in the night, you won't roll on to the zip. We'll see . . .http://shop.rti-militarysurplus.com
                            They do a huge range of 'everything'. Look closely at the shop frontage and you can see what look like a couple of bombs sticking up vertically by the entrance. I did ask, and no they are not bombs, they are disposable fuel tanks for aircraft. I also got some new (actually ten years old but never issued) what I think are kangaroo skin 'combat warm weather' gloves. In case you didn't know, kangaroo skin is very very thin, and very very tough. Professional motorbike racers have their leathers made of it because you can come off a motorbike at 140mph, bounce along the road and not have any skin abrasion. Plenty of broken bones, but the leather won't rip apart so it holds all your body parts together inside the suit. It's very expensive stuff. These gloves are 'desert camoulflage' colour and have a kevlar pad on the back of the hand. The reason I like them is because they are truly excellent for working on boilers which tend to have metalwork made by Gillette, the razor company. So I don't get cut hands. Also as they are very thin, you can pick up a small screw with them. These gloves are labelled 'Combat warm weather GL-8415-99 490-4288 DCIBESL/6007' So now you know! I would post a picture but I don't want to use up server space, unless anyone wants to see them.
                            Necessarium esse superfluum Latin

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                              #44
                              are you sure you've remained on topic Andrew!!

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                                #45
                                We have a lovely seamstress near us who replaces sleeping bag zips for £10. Interesting re the gloves, Andrew. My sister-in-law brought us some possum skin gloves from Oz. they were thin and very warm, but we lost them!
                                Must try some of that dehydrated food. (there, that brought me back on topic!)

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