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Common problems of age in C15 Romas

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    Common problems of age in C15 Romas

    Hi Ant
    Have been recently adopted by a 16.5 year old C15, with what seems to be reasonable mileage for age (84,000), do you have a list of things we should look for, especially those age related? The full service history shows regular maintenance and belts replaced fairly recently.

    So far we've found:
    1. Split in filler hose air vent pipe (diesel smell in locker if tank filled completely)
    2. Kink in filler water drain pipe (may cause water in tank?)
    3. Split in camshaft cover oil scavenger pipe (would this cause oil loss?)
    4. A little oil around camshaft cover (Split pipe above? Bolts not tight?)
    5. Brake vacuum pump apparently not doing anything (hopefully just split diaphragm)
    6. Blown/dim instrument panel lights and heater control panel lights
    7. Rust - not too bad (but where are the key places to look?)
    8. Tyres - 1 x 1998, 2 x 2002, 1 x 2003 - all good tread, all replaced


    I've just noticed a clank from the back going over sharp dips/bumps which I hope is only loose tools...

    cheers
    Bill

    #2
    Hi Bill.
    A 16.5 yr old C15 is not unlike a 16.5 yr old child, not without its running costs, wont always do as its told but still commands your affection!
    The rust will be an ongoing task. The doors, the cills, the engine bay bulkhead, the inner front wings, the area around where the hand brake cables enter the cab under floor, the rear chassis legs, rear cross member and the outer ends of the central cross member.
    Your clanking sounds like the rear arm bushes moving on the back axle, check for tyre wear on the inside tyre walls, you'll need the bushes changing.
    Thanks
    Ant

    Comment


      #3
      Followup

      Hi Ant

      Many thanks for this - I've now had the rear suspension looked at by my usual trustworthy mechanic who confirmed the bearings need doing - he couldn't show play with prybar due to strength of springs, but saw rust dribbles; it's also getting quite clanky and inner tyre/wheelarch clearance is small.

      Have checked part availability. Options are:
      1) Recon heavy rear axle from axledirect.com £454 (2 year guarantee) or
      2) Recon pair radius arms £293 or
      3) New pair Bearing kits £141

      All including VAT and freight

      Awaiting estimate from mechanic, but my inclination is to go with option 2. What would you recommend?

      Also needs welding at rear corners of chassis (next to the step down in the fibreglass in the Romahome. Some other rust elsewhere but not bad, just needs wirebrushing and priming/sealing.

      Many thanks
      Bill

      Comment


        #4
        Bill.
        I doubt the actual radius arms need replacing, much more likely the bushes are all thats worn. The work involved in replacing the arms is similar to replacing the bushes. I'd go for either the whole axle or the bushes.
        Ant

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks and more on the vacuum pump

          Many thanks Ant, will go for just the bearings, as my local garage was suggesting it would cost £400 labour to fit the £450 refurb axle, and http://www.sspengineering.co.uk/ will do the bearings for half that, and seem very helpful.

          Have now got the brake vacuum pump off, as the diaphragm looks fine - no sign of wear. There was no oil at all in main part of pump, the hole in the con rod is worn through and the cam part is almost worn away completely!

          Sourcing a replacement is proving tricky, as this is a '95 with power steering and most pumps I find are either not belt-driven, or are the non-power steer belt pumps (like this Bolk http://www.mister-auto.co.uk/en/vacu...2245_g387.html ) which though similar dates and Haynes implys won't fit. I believe I need a Pierburg. Trying to find one from a scrapper.

          By the way, came across a diaphragm for £50
          http://www.gsfcarparts.com/182pc0080

          cheers
          bill
          Last edited by billdash; 21-07-2012, 19:13.

          Comment


            #6
            I had a C15 with worn rear arm bearings so I bought a secondhand axle 2001 ish and fitted it myself. cost £60 from ebay

            Comment


              #7
              I cannot understand the labour costs.

              There is much more work involved in stripping the axle to repair the bearings than in swapping an axle.

              Also a specialised spring compressor (a Citroen special tool) is required.

              Replacing the rear axle is a competent home mechanic job.

              Peter

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks Rio and Peter,

                Will query the labour costs. I think part of it would be for moving brakes/wheel bearings etc. to bare-bones recond axle. axledirect.com quoted £600 for swapping axle with recond one if I took the Romahome to them.

                Will investigate availability and cost of warranted spare axle/subframe from breakers - but it has to be the 945 kg C15 van one. I see Haynes awards this job 3 spanners, which is about my limit...

                Have had a quote for £100 from Rochdale Van Breakers for one in 'mint' condition which sounds rather too good to be true - has anyone dealt with them? Found two reviews for them - 1 good 1 bad...

                cheers
                Bill

                Comment


                  #9
                  £100 for a secondhand axle is about right but if you're not a technical minded person then a garage will convince you it's not in your capability to do the job yourself.

                  The axle is held in place by 6 nuts,3 either side, remove the exhaust, disconnect brake pipes and handbrake. I can guide you through if you like.

                  what part of the country are you from?

                  There's no such thing as a 945 axle only a 600 and 765. a 600 axle will work if you have spring assissters. here's a bit i wrote when Ichanged mine.

                  1 I jacked up the back of the camper and made it secure on some blocks and pieces.
                  2Took off the exhaust, the whole lot at the down pipe. disconnected the brake feed pipe to the brake regulater.
                  3 Took off the wheels.and hubs.
                  4 Undid the handbrake cables on both sides.
                  5. using my windy gun I undid the 6 nuts holding the rear axle in place.
                  7 swapped a brake pipe or two onto the newer axle.
                  8 jacked up the new axle and secured the 6 nuts.
                  9 re-fited the brake feed and the 2 handbrake cables.
                  10 welded the exhaust seam with stainless sheet , it was corroded,and painted the welds.
                  11. re-fitted the exhaust.
                  12 blead the brakes and fitted the wheels.
                  13 adjusted handbrake.
                  15 took for test drive and felt the brakes were binding.
                  16 stripped both hubs and found the brake cylinders were seized.
                  17 removed those cylinders and replaced with the ones on my original axle.
                  18 re-bleed the brakes and re-fitted the hubs and wheels.
                  19 took for test drive and it's closer to OK but I'll need to adjust regulator.

                  So the whole job cost me £60 axle, £1.99 brake fluid, £15 diesel to drive to Cowplain nr Portmuft. Total £77 as opposed to £700 for a Citroen specialist to do.
                  Last edited by RRH; 23-07-2012, 08:39.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks rio, I'm in Southend.

                    I'd had a read of your very helpful post before and am in two minds. We know the current axle has good wheel bearings and brake cylinders - so no complications likely, time is short and the axle weight is a little off-putting. Plus having the garage receipt and guarantee will be useful when selling the van (when we go back to New Zealand).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Many thanks to Ant and all others for their advice.

                      We decided to visit Robin Mountjoy & co. at http://www.sspengineering.co.uk/ (thanks Ant for recommendation seen on another thread) for an axle recondition at their workshop in deepest Devon.

                      Once we'd found them via wee twisty lanes (Note: although signposts point to Broadhays it is an unsigned large farm, NOT a village), all went swimmingly. For less than the cost of recon axle elsewhere they stripped it, fitted recon arms (the old bearings has broken up to such an extent that the old arms' seatings were worn), new stub axles, all new bearings etc. tested and with 12 month guarantee. (though we expect the new bearing will last ten years). The 'home' no longer clanks going over the bumps.

                      They also welded a couple of places excellently and for a reasonable price, and advised on treatment of minor rust elsewhere.

                      Very impressed with their experience, expertise, advice and attitude. The sun shone whilst we picniced on the lawn, chatted to the retired (but still involved) founder, a real engineer character with lots of interesting stories and had a most relaxing garage visit.

                      They make and recondition parts to high precision, including parts for North Sea oil installations and for Europe. In an age of built in obsolesence, it good to see them using real skill and reducing waste.

                      Very happy with them, have full confidence in their work and recommend them. Best on a dry day as their hoist is outside...

                      cheers
                      Bill

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by billdash View Post
                        Many thanks to Ant and all others for their advice.

                        We decided to visit Robin Mountjoy & co. at http://www.sspengineering.co.uk/ (thanks Ant for recommendation seen on another thread) for an axle recondition at their workshop in deepest Devon.

                        Once we'd found them via wee twisty lanes (Note: although signposts point to Broadhays it is an unsigned large farm, NOT a village), all went swimmingly. For less than the cost of recon axle elsewhere they stripped it, fitted recon arms (the old bearings has broken up to such an extent that the old arms' seatings were worn), new stub axles, all new bearings etc. tested and with 12 month guarantee. (though we expect the new bearing will last ten years). The 'home' no longer clanks going over the bumps.

                        They also welded a couple of places excellently and for a reasonable price, and advised on treatment of minor rust elsewhere.

                        Very impressed with their experience, expertise, advice and attitude. The sun shone whilst we picniced on the lawn, chatted to the retired (but still involved) founder, a real engineer character with lots of interesting stories and had a most relaxing garage visit.

                        They make and recondition parts to high precision, including parts for North Sea oil installations and for Europe. In an age of built in obsolesence, it good to see them using real skill and reducing waste.

                        Very happy with them, have full confidence in their work and recommend them. Best on a dry day as their hoist is outside...

                        cheers
                        Bill
                        PS Some days after posting this, investigated a clunk and discovered that n/s rear wheel had considerable play (4-5 mm at rim). RAC unable to help bar saying that vehicle should not be driven and recommending back-of-a-truck lift to go 1 mile to garage - they don't carry 41mm socket. After ringing Mountjoys and finding a farmer friend with a 3/4" socket set, tightened up the wheel nut to torque and after another 300 miles all still seems OK.

                        Apparently the bearing can sometimes catch when wheel nut being tightened, and free up after driving. However as the nut was visibly not as far on as the other side, I think this should have been spotted originally. Still recommend them, but would take a closer look at final job and recommend checking wheels after 100 m.

                        Comment

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