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  • Twolitre
    replied
    Originally posted by Misted View Post
    Hi Jim,

    Thank you for that feedback that’s exactly what I needed. The vendors of the expensive lamps sowed the seed of doubt in my mind. I have to admit that I have blown one or two single LEDs by applying a bit too much voltage but I am sure the commercial arrays from China are conservatively rated.

    I did assume that the LEDs were wired in parallel as, if in series, failure of one LED would stop the rest in that string from working. For lamps arranged with LEDs in parallel a voltage control circuit would make sense as more efficient than resistors. Boatlamps and Aten say most of their lamps will run off 10-30V.

    I like the look of your Gentry. I ran a Marlin for a little while but Lyn was never fond of it so it went some years ago.

    Thanks for your advice
    Graham
    Hi, Misted
    Pleased I have been able to help. Glad you like the Gentry. Very contarily, cosidering that virtually everything mechanical had already given service for the lifetime of a scrapped Triumph Vitesse, the car has been the most reliable I have ever had.
    When I built it in 1984 my Wife was not enthusiastic and let me play with it on my own.
    However after a few months, when I bought a caravan to tow to Gentry Rallies etc., She suddenly said, out of the blue, "Can I come with you".
    That opened up a whole new world of friends. She took an unexpected liking to the car and even took it shopping sometimes, though she always grumbled about lack of "boot space".
    We had a wonderful time, but it all had to end at Christmas 1957.
    Many happy memories travel with me in that car!
    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Misted
    replied
    Hi Jim,

    Thank you for that feedback that’s exactly what I needed. The vendors of the expensive lamps sowed the seed of doubt in my mind. I have to admit that I have blown one or two single LEDs by applying a bit too much voltage but I am sure the commercial arrays from China are conservatively rated.

    I did assume that the LEDs were wired in parallel as, if in series, failure of one LED would stop the rest in that string from working. For lamps arranged with LEDs in parallel a voltage control circuit would make sense as more efficient than resistors. Boatlamps and Aten say most of their lamps will run off 10-30V.

    I like the look of your Gentry. I ran a Marlin for a little while but Lyn was never fond of it so it went some years ago.

    Thanks for your advice
    Graham

    Leave a comment:


  • Twolitre
    replied
    Hi, Misted,
    I have relied almost entirely on "cheap" LEDs in my van for years. They enabled me, as I have said somewhere else on here to to stay away from home for three weeks without EHU (6 or 7 nights on each site visited).
    I say "almost" because I have a 15 Watt fluorescent which I hardly use.
    My lighting is from clusters (comparable with 21 Watt car brake lampbulbs for output) of LEDs mounted in SBC (bayonet caps) which fit straight into my reading (spot) lamps.
    These were bought quite cheaply on ebay from China and any one is usually sufficient in my Romini.
    I have toyed with the idea of fitting one of those flexible LED strips which look like sellotape with bumps in on the ceiling, but have never got around to it.
    Wherever clusters of LEDs are used there seems no sound reason for using resistors which raise the cost and add bulk.
    The figures I have always understood and found reliable in practice are 13.2volts for a fully charged battery and 10.8 volts for a safely discharged (without damaging) "flat" battery. A variation of only just over 2 volts and about half a volt per LED when connected in series.
    You are right about the charging voltage, but would you be using the LEDs on the move? In any case, the ones I use which are intended for automotive brake lights must be intended to accept charging voltage?
    Jim.

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  • Misted
    replied
    Thanks for your comments Jim. I agree resistors are not necessary but here I am referring specifically to the cheaper lamps available on the web. Comments, made by some suppliers of the more expensive lamps with built in regulators, suggest that the cheaper lamps sold by their competitors rely upon resistors to control the current through the LED(s) which, they suggest, makes the lamps less efficient and less long lived.

    I understand their point is that the cheap Led lamps need to work adequately in the voltage range 12.1V (low battery) to 12.6V (fully charged battery) and occasionally 14.5V at maximum charge rate from the alternator. If the current control resistor is large enough to handle 14.5V will the lamps be rather dim at 12.1V?

    It would be fun to make up some lamps from discrete components but I expect they would be more expensive than the regulator controlled lamps from suppliers like Aten and Boatlamps and take me ages.

    The bottom line question is has anyone tried the cheap LED lamps and were they satisfactory? Ideally has anyone made a direct comparison of both types?

    Apologies for hijacking this thread perhaps my question should be moved?

    Leave a comment:


  • Twolitre
    replied
    Resistors are not necessarily used on 12 volt LED setups.
    Single LEDs may be wired in series (like resistors etc.) to cope with 12 volts. That should not reduce brightness and I think that to save volume inside a "bulb" cap there will be several parallel circuits of 3 or 4 LEDs each to control brightness and voltage across individual LEDs.
    My son has a model railway with LED street lamps. The street lamps, on 12 volts, are wired in clusters of 4 to avoid use and expense of resistors.
    As an aside, I have recently spent three weeks away from home with my Romini wiyhout recourse to EHU with only a small car battery. Admittedly I rarely use a TV and did not have one with me, though My radio was used every morning and evening.
    Jim.

    Leave a comment:


  • Misted
    replied
    Thanks to Jim and Peter for useful comments re LED lights.

    My Tirol (Peugeot Expert based) has only three internal lights, one in the cab and one each side of the “living” area. All have 10 watt filament bulbs, one festoon pattern and the other two BA9 bulbs. This van doesn’t have a leisure battery so I have decided to fit LED bulbs and so far have found that there is a LED festoon equivalent and room for 24 SMD LED lamps in the other two. Total power reduced from 30 watts to about 6.5 watts. I have two new ceramic G4 bulb holders to replace the BA9 pattern so almost ready to make the change.

    I have a choice, LED lamps with built in active regulation which allows them to run on 10-30V DC at £6-9 each or cheaper LED lamps sold as suitable for 12V motor vehicle systems but which rely on resistors to control the current and so might not be quite so bright or might have a shorter life.

    Have any forum members experience which might help me choose?

    In real terms brightness might be more important than service life as even the least good LED lamps appear to last for about 10,000 hours, 5 times as long as a Halogen bulb. A quick calculation suggests that I am unlikely to need lighting in the van for more than 300 hours per year so the lamps could last for more than 30 years!

    Thanks

    Graham

    Leave a comment:


  • peterholden
    replied
    All our lights are led now, we can manage for ages off grid.

    Peter

    Leave a comment:


  • Twolitre
    replied
    Although I admit I have no fridge and rarely view TV in my van. The difference is that I have never needed to use EHU since I switched to LEDs, even staying (static) on sites for up to a week.
    I reckon the LEDs have paid for themselves many, many, many times over.
    Jim.

    Leave a comment:


  • FrankieWilson
    replied
    Originally posted by Lesleyprytherch View Post
    Hi Ant,
    I've just bought a couple of lovely mini spot
    led lights for my romahome. My old ones were very dated. Now I've opened them they have little halogen bulbs & I was wondering if they use much more power as I only use a small leisure battery.

    Thanks, Lesley
    Yes these halogen lights does consume much more power.. You could have opted for some other lights...I am using led spot lights
    Last edited by FrankieWilson; 24-06-2013, 08:29.

    Leave a comment:


  • alf39
    replied
    LED Bulbs

    Hi Look at the Aten lighting website atenlighting.co.uk

    if you want led bulbs and are unsure ring Aten and speak with then they will point you in the right direction and will even send you a sample to try

    Alf

    Leave a comment:


  • Lesleyprytherch
    replied
    Thanks

    Thanks everyone. I've looked down the path of the LED bulbs but I don't seem to be able to find anything suitable. The new lights are installed and look beautiful. I love them. I only run the 2 little wall lights & a small strip light. So hopefully they won't take up too much power anyway.

    Thanks again.

    Leave a comment:


  • alf39
    replied
    Originally posted by Twolitre View Post
    This query was addressed to Ant, so I did not reply earlier.
    I have two reading lights intended for 21W SCC bulbs. The sort of bulbs in car rear brake lights. I replaced those bulbs with LED lamps arranged in a cluster in an SCC cap (easily found on ebay). These give out supposedly the same light as a 21W incandescent bulb, but I think much brighter. And on almost no electricity.
    I now rarely use my fluorescent strip light because the reading lights are bright enough to light the whole Romini. Of course the real bonus is that the charge in my battery lasts several times as long.
    Jim.
    Jim I have swapped the 12" 8w fluorescent tubes in our Heki roof light for 250mm led high power strips from Aten lighting these are a little brighter than the 8w tubes but less than a quarter of the power.
    I have relocated the 8w tubes to the rear bar of the Heki to give light to the rear of the van if we need it

    Alf

    Leave a comment:


  • Twolitre
    replied
    Originally posted by ant View Post
    Hi Lesley.
    The new lights will use a bit more power but for the time the lights are on all together it probably won't matter. If you're worried about it you could fit some replacement LED bulbs and reduce the power consumption.
    Ant
    This query was addressed to Ant, so I did not reply earlier.
    I have two reading lights intended for 21W SCC bulbs. The sort of bulbs in car rear brake lights. I replaced those bulbs with LED lamps arranged in a cluster in an SCC cap (easily found on ebay). These give out supposedly the same light as a 21W incandescent bulb, but I think much brighter. And on almost no electricity.
    I now rarely use my fluorescent strip light because the reading lights are bright enough to light the whole Romini. Of course the real bonus is that the charge in my battery lasts several times as long.
    Jim.

    Leave a comment:


  • ant
    replied
    Hi Lesley.
    The new lights will use a bit more power but for the time the lights are on all together it probably won't matter. If you're worried about it you could fit some replacement LED bulbs and reduce the power consumption.
    Ant

    Leave a comment:


  • Lesleyprytherch
    started a topic Halogen lamps

    Halogen lamps

    Hi Ant,
    I've just bought a couple of lovely mini spot lights for my romahome. My old ones were very dated. Now I've opened them they have little halogen bulbs & I was wondering if they use much more power as I only use a small leisure battery.

    Thanks, Lesley

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