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    Engine Temperature

    My Romahome has a 2.0 litre hdi engine. The temperature gauge normally shows a steady 80ish degrees. However, in slow traffic it can start to climb although l have never been stuck long enough for it to go much above 90. This engine is new to me and I don't know whether this is normal or not.

    #2
    Originally posted by jondxxx View Post
    My Romahome has a 2.0 litre hdi engine. The temperature gauge normally shows a steady 80ish degrees. However, in slow traffic it can start to climb although l have never been stuck long enough for it to go much above 90. This engine is new to me and I don't know whether this is normal or not.
    I am not familiar with the engine in your motorhome, but vehicles in general will generally have an increase in coolant temperature when in slow or stationary traffic. Perfectly normal. Your vehicle undoubtedly has pressurised cooling system which raises the boiling point of water to well over 100 degreesC. as a safety margin.
    As long as it never boils I would not consider your experience to be unusual or a cause for concern.
    Jim (Ex motor mechanic.)
    Last edited by Twolitre; 12-08-2017, 12:18 PM.
    Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

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      #3
      wot jim said

      mine goes up to 90 too and the fan kicks in

      kyran

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        #4
        TRY THIS FIRST: With the engine off for safety, try spinning the fan blades by hand, if it spins that's good ... if it doesn't, lubricate and manipulate it until it does spin. Block the radiator, run the engine, increase the revs to about 1500 and wait until the needle is in the red... the fan should start. If it does … stop worrying, it’s OK. Engines have pressurised cooling systems which raise the boiling point of the coolant to well above 100C, so you could take it to 100 safely. BUT ON NO ACCOUNT remove the cooling system pressure cap with the engine hot.

        HOWEVER … if the fan does not run with the needle in the red I’d suggest these checks:

        CAVEAT: The ECU of modern engines can get very upset if certain circuits are disconnected then reconnected with the ignition on, suggest you establish whether this is likely to happen if you disconnect the radiator fan sensor.

        I don't know your engine but normally somewhere on the radiator or nearby in a hose there lives a sensor with two spade connectors (or a dedicated plug/socket arrangement) which connect it to the fan. The sensor is a simple thermal switch that is either open or closed. In one state the fan will be off, in the other it will run. With the ignition on, you could pull the connectors off, if the fan starts that's reassuring, if the fan doesn't run, short the two connectors together.... does it run? If it doesn't run in either state then suspect the fan itself.... they seldom are required to operate in a healthy vehicle with a good clean radiator, and so sometimes the fan seizes solid. If the fan spins freely but cannot be made to run, then it's possible that the fan motor has burned out or there is a wiring fault in the supply to it.

        If you have a multimeter, set it to Ohms (resistance) and test the output from the sensor in both hot and cold states, see what appears on the screen... in one state the reading should be zero (ie. switch is closed and passing electricity) in the other it should be infinite (ie switch open circuit).

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          #5
          Originally posted by mikeroch View Post
          TRY THIS FIRST:
          CAVEAT:
          I don't know your engine but normally somewhere on the radiator or nearby in a hose there lives a sensor with two spade connectors (or a dedicated plug/socket arrangement) which connect it to the fan. The sensor is a simple thermal switch that is either open or closed. In one state the fan will be off, in the other it will run. With the ignition on, you could pull the connectors off, if the fan starts that's reassuring, if the fan doesn't run, short the two connectors together.... does it run? If it doesn't run in either state then suspect the fan itself.... they seldom are required to operate in a healthy vehicle with a good clean radiator, and so sometimes the fan seizes solid. If the fan spins freely but cannot be made to run, then it's possible that the fan motor has burned out or there is a wiring fault in the supply to it.

          If you have a multimeter, set it to Ohms (resistance) and test the output from the sensor in both hot and cold states, see what appears on the screen... in one state the reading should be zero (ie. switch is closed and passing electricity) in the other it should be infinite (ie switch open circuit).

          If you are really concerned, or a belt and braces man, you can do as some people do. Find the 2 connectprs to the to the thermal switch splice in a wire to each wire - take this to a switch on the dash - you will then have a manual over-ride if you think the temperature is rising you can turn on the fan before the sensor switch does.
          Incidentally since I got the Clockwork Orange in Feb I have covered a few thousand miles - the only time the fan came on was in a trafic jam iduring the Edinburgh rush-hour.
          I nearly jumped out of my skin at the strange noise when the fan started up for the first (and thus far) only time.
          Jon
          Amor omnia vincit et nos cedamus amori

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            #6
            When we towed caravans I always fitted an override switch.

            I have removed the engine driven fan on our classic land rover for safety reasons (no radiator cowl meant the fan was exposed and could do all sorts of damage when the engine is running).

            I have fitted an electric fan in front of the radiator with a dash mounted switch.

            Peter

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              #7
              Good thought. ..

              Yes, good thought. I built a camper from a LDV which tended to run hot under stress and did exactly as you describe, wiring a dashboard switch to the fan sensor/switch. It was very comforting to be able to have manual control of the cooling fan when a long climb was ahead or the traffic became sluggish.

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                #8
                Mountains and molehills come to mind with this thread!
                Jim.
                Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

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                  #9
                  Thanks for the various replies. I suspect that I am just seeing normal behaviour but this engine is new to me and on my other car the temperature never varies and was interested in other users experience.

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