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    Tyre pressure monitors

    Does anyone have any experience of these systems in their Motorhome/car/caravan? Your insight would be welcome before I splash some cash!

    When we bought our caravan, Pauline and Graham suggested we consider having tyron bands fitted, in case of a blow out. I have been reading up about them but some people suggest that as blow outs are most often caused by a tyre deflating either slowly or as a result of damage, a tyre pressure monitoring system is a better choice.

    Tyrepal.co.uk is advertised in a lot of caravan and Motorhome magazines and seems to have good reviews. They have £65 off their 4 wheel system at the moment too.
    Why not have a look at my latest wildlife photos, habitat projects and general natural world related shenanigans? https://facebook.com/Watsonswildlife

    #2
    Tyron bands in themselves do not prevent a blowout. What they do is keep the damaged tyre on the rim so that you can come to a controlled stop. When we had a caravan we suffered a puncture at speed and we were able stop safely and drive slowly to a place where we could change the wheel. We were being followed by another englishman who was a caravanner but was solo, he stopped to help. He was very impressed because when the tyre first went expected the caravan to go over but it stayed upright.

    Peter

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      #3
      Thanks Peter, sorry my post wasn't clear. I wasn't meaning a tyre band would stop the blow out but will help keep the tyre on the rim and therefore hopefully allow the caravan to stay upright, its just that a big consensus seems to suggest that rather than having the band in place in case a blow out occurs, that by monitoring the tyre pressure a blow out should hopefully be avoided in the first place. Advances in tyre technology mean that blow outs rarely, if ever, occur unless the tyre is damaged or overheating and the monitors alert you to pressure drops or rises and temperature rises too, giving you chance to stop and rectify the problem before a blow out.


      Glad of your input though, a positive report on the tyron is equally helpful as that is our other course of action, it would be more costly though as our new van is a twin axle= 4 bands to fit!!
      Last edited by glenw; 02-01-2012, 20:02.
      Why not have a look at my latest wildlife photos, habitat projects and general natural world related shenanigans? https://facebook.com/Watsonswildlife

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        #4
        In our case, we had picked up a nail, it was still in the tyre, and we had travelled quite a distance. We think that the tyre had deflated slowly until it got to a pressure where it couldnt sustain the van and that is when it suddenly went.

        There is a consesus among the tyre trade that many of the motorway blowouts are cause by damage to the inner walls/shoulders of the tyres caused by people straddling the square type speed cushions. The advice is to put one wheel straight over the centre of the cushion so that the other runs through the gap, but of course the speed needs to be much slower.

        Peter

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          #5
          When our caravan was written off in an accident the police suggested it may have been a blow out on the caravan tyre but we couldn't know for sure because of the damage sustained. As you say Tyron bands won't stop a blow out but will help you to keep control of the van, ours went into a snake and went off the motorway out of control.

          I've not heard of tyre pressure monitors but if they have good reviews and are cheaper for you it sounds a good option, hopefully someone else might have experience of them.
          Graham
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            #6
            Originally posted by peterholden View Post
            I

            There is a consesus among the tyre trade that many of the motorway blowouts are cause by damage to the inner walls/shoulders of the tyres caused by people straddling the square type speed cushions. The advice is to put one wheel straight over the centre of the cushion so that the other runs through the gap, but of course the speed needs to be much slower.

            Peter
            --------------------------------
            That is a very interesting point! I always straddle those speed cushions, believing it was the safest and most comfortable way to negotiate them. Will change my driving pattern now. Thanks.
            Carpe diem! :)

            Comment


              #7
              When you're towing a caravan, you just get over the speed humps the best way you can - but slowly! I've tried all ways and can't find a best route to take.

              A tyre pressure monitor sounds like a good idea to me. But what I do is always stop after a mile or so and check whether the tyres are more than lukewarm, and whilst I'm at it, check that all links to the car are ok. I rarely travel more than 60-80 miles without stopping for a break and I check them then as well. This wouldn't allow for a blow out though, and although the tire monitor would tell you the tyre pressure was down, it wouldn't be able to tell you that you had an 'instant' blow out! I'd think that would be safer on a twin wheeled caravan anyway, as both tyres on one side wouldn't be likely to blow at the same time, you'd still have one to get you to a safe place to stop.
              Last edited by jayjay; 03-01-2012, 11:18.

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                #8
                Hi Jayjay

                I am not just meaning when towing. It is whenever you meet one,towing or solo.

                It must be a serious problem for Glen with ambulances as Sheffield seems to have more than its fair share of speed cushions. In fact the road near where my dad lives (Hucklow Road Glen) has a large number of very fierce full width speed humps, they are very painful for patients in ambulances no matter how careful the driver is. This road is also on a major bus route and bus passengers get seasick.

                Peter

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hi Pete, yes I know what you mean - just out in the car it's abominable round here and hurts my back whenever I go over one. I used to straddle them myself just to get away from that jarring bump... one ripped off the cat cover on the exhaust! So now I go the hard way...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by peterholden View Post
                    It must be a serious problem for Glen with ambulances as Sheffield seems to have more than its fair share of speed cushions. In fact the road near where my dad lives (Hucklow Road Glen) has a large number of very fierce full width speed humps, they are very painful for patients in ambulances no matter how careful the driver is. This road is also on a major bus route and bus passengers get seasick.

                    Peter
                    You are not wrong Peter, Sheffield seems to have an epidemic of speed humps, coupled with a nasty case of potholes!! Hucklow road's humps are possibly the worst I can think of too i'm afraid, they have snow on the peaks even at the height of summer

                    Seriously though, there is no doubt they slow us down, cause discomfort and I'm sure they probably account for the vehicle suspension problems we regularly have.
                    Why not have a look at my latest wildlife photos, habitat projects and general natural world related shenanigans? https://facebook.com/Watsonswildlife

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                      #11
                      I don't think I subscribe to tyre damage by speed humps. Tyre damage is much more likely from kerbs and it frightens me how many people blithely mount kerbs to turn round. Or by dislodging and (partially) deflating the tyre by disturbing the rim seal by the same malpractice.
                      Blow outs are most likely where the rather fragile wall of the tyre is damaged by something sticking up higher than the tyre tread. Like a kerb or debris in the road.
                      I do believe that speed humps have possibly cost lives through suspension damage and any MOT Tester will agree that suspension "fails" have increased enormously with the proliferation of speed humps.
                      I am surprised that ambulance drivers have never raised a fuss about them.
                      Jim.
                      Last edited by Twolitre; 05-01-2012, 18:14.
                      Keeping people waiting is stealing a part of their lives.

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                        #12
                        Hi Jim

                        Apparently it is because the speed cushions are tapered and the walls scrub because of the speed differential and because it is on the inside it cannot be seen, but, I also subscribe to the suspension damage and the consequences that has on tyre wear (tracking etc).

                        I am amazed at the number of people who "kerb" tyres who seem to be oblivious of the damage that the cause both seen and unseen. Many years ago whilst on holiday in France we had to take avoiding action when a british car came round the corner on the wrong side. I hit a kerb at an angle at about 15mph and the tyre was a write off, I had taken a chunk out of the wall. The damage was easy to see but equally the tyre could have been damaged on the inside without any external signs.

                        Peter

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